Candidates Evaluation

September 13, 2010 at 10:03 am 3 comments

First we wish to thank all candidates who took the time to submit responses to our sustainability questions. We know candidates are very busy and returning responses says that they do care. We would also like to thank the people who reviewed and summarized the responses.

The three sustainability groups on Maui- Upcountry Sustainability, South Maui Sustainability and West Maui Sustainability- had their questions to ask and their issues to be addressed. Mayoral, County Council, State Representative and School Board candidates were sent a questionnaire asking them to give their specific plans on how to address the issues of local food production, land use, energy production, water, waste management, supporting the local economy, and supporting Maui citizens. These seven areas could be considered the mainstay of what people who are passionate about sustainability spend their time thinking and taking action about. Knowing where candidates stand and what they plan on doing offers a chance to hold them accountable if they are elected.

Of the fifty-eight candidates, twenty-one responded. Those who did not may never have seen the questionnaire, may have been too busy or may have felt sustainability wasn’t their main focus or their supporters’ main focus. Those who did respond were informed that their responses would be evaluated by local citizens who care about these issues and have knowledge of the complex and dynamic ways these issues manifest on Maui. Thirty-three evaluations were done by twenty-three evaluators who are either members of the three sustainability groups, of several environmental groups, or specific experts in each issue. They rated the responses on a scale of four options ranging from ‘addressed most priority sustainability areas’ to ‘survey answers are not aligned with sustainability goals’. It was a blind evaluation: each candidate was given a number so that evaluators were unaware of which candidate was responding to avoid preexisting prejudices. There are a wide variety of responses from candidates. In pulling together the summaries, we used an average as the assessors responses were equally varied. We hope you find this useful in making your voting decisions.

We’ve put together the responses received such that you can review all answers by issue or by candidate, depending on your preferences. We encourage you to leave constructive comments. This table summarizes the assessment performed by sustainability advocates across Maui. You can click “View” to go directly to see each response. Here is the scale that was used.

  • ++ (Bright Green) Addressed most priority sustainability areas
  • + (Light Green) Addressed some sustainability areas
  • – (White) Answers did not adequately address some key sustainability points
  • – – (Yellow) Survey answers are not aligned with sustainability goals.

Summary Table

Topics>> Local Food Land Use Energy Water Local Economy Waste Management Support of Citizens
Mayoral Candidates
Alan Arakawa
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Chris Hart
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Jonathon Olson
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Ori Kopelman
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Sally Chow Hammond +
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Sol Kaho`ohalahala +
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County Council
Don Couch
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N/A ++
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Eve Clute ++
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Elle Cochran
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Gladys Baisa +
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Ke’eaumoku Kapu ++
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Kai Nishiki ++
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Mary Cochran +
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Michael Victorino +
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Paul Laub
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Robert Carroll
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Wayne Nishiki ++
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State Representative
Dean Schmucker
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George Fontaine +
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Gil Keith-Agaran ++
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Johanna Amorin
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Kyle Yamashita +
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Netra Halperin +
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School Board
Barry Wurst ++
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Ray Hart +
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The Issues and Questions That Were Asked

Local Food

Maui needs a healthy agricultural community made up of large and small growers, as well as abundant community and backyard gardens. The produce of these efforts should primarily feed the citizens of Maui County. To further these aims how will you specifically promote and support large and small growers and community gardens with policies and incentives? Summary Table

Land Use

The future Maui County will depend upon an adjustment in land use policies and zoning in order to grow the food we need sustainably and reduce the need for unnecessary travel. As land and fuel become scarcer, with policies and incentives, how will you specifically promote, support and enforce balanced use of land for local needs in an environmentally sensitive way? Summary Table

Energy

Maui County must quickly transition to renewable sources of energy, even if doing so causes some disruption of normal activities. As fossil fuels become increasingly expensive and less available, what specific policies, incentives, penalties and enforcement strategies will you promote? Summary Table

Water

Water is a critical concern for a sustainable Maui. Everyone and everything depends on it, therefore policies must be designed to make the most of every available drop, for people, animals, and the aina. With this in mind, specifically, how will you use policies, incentives, enforcement and penalties to address current and future water needs?   Summary Table

Local Economy

A healthy Maui economy includes small, local and home-based businesses thriving and encouraged by State and County officials. How will you specifically promote and support these businesses? Summary Table

Waste Management

Our small island cannot continue to accumulate unproductive and potentially hazardous waste, storing it here or shipping it somewhere else. Specifically, how will you use policies, incentives, enforcement and penalties to address progressive waste management strategies? Summary Table

Support of Citizens

Maui citizens and officials must work together with trust, openness and respect. What specific actions would you take to promote this positive relationship? Summary Table

Candidate Responses



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate
Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Summary Table

I will work to add language in the Agricultural Definitions for the County that will specifically allow small agricultural growers and community gardens status in our County policies.
I will further work to eliminate the decisions that are being put into County policies by the Current Administration that discourage small agricultural growers.



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Summary Table

(a) Develop more agricultural parks; (b) Develop water sources for domestic and diversified agricultural uses; (c) Work with sustainability organizations and others to identify sites for community gardens; (d) With assistance from an Agricultural Advisory Committee to the Office of Economic Development, review issues and needs to sustain agriculture, including priorities for marketing and promotion; land use policy issues; shipping and transportation problems; and other related matters.



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Summary Table

I will assist the large and small growers to find solutions with all critical parties to further promote and utilize the farmers of the County of Maui. We will utilize the UH system and the larger farmers to assist our smaller farmers to best utilize the land and the resources necessary to produce products that will promote the sustainability of Maui by its farmers. We will coordinate with the resorts and restaurants and schools and our citizens to find the optimal sustainability to keep products on Maui or to export products if that is a more viable and prosperous solution. I believe tax breaks and water breaks for agricultural production would be the proper means to use as a policy and incentives to maintain agricultural production. My business background and the resources we have available as a County can only offer us great opportunities to expand the viability of agriculture as our second most important industry.



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Summary Table

Assuring locally grown food would be a high priority for my administration. I remember when a few years ago the island almost ran out of dog food due to a dock strike on the West coast. My 2 dogs would not have been happy but fortunately the president of the US ordered an end to the strike and ships started arriving again. We need to have locally grown food for us humans to avert a similar situation. Besides it’s a security issue as short-term disruptions are possible in food shipments from the mainland and the rest of the world as happened in the weeks following 9/11/01.

I would favor lobbying for a 10% to 20% tax credit for varying size local growers— up to 20% for small growers and 10% for larger farmers to encourage and grow their businesses. Also Maui county could label its food with a “local” label thereby helping many of us who would choose to keep the money on our island buy from our fellow islanders rather than buying cheaper off-island produce.



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Summary Table

As mayor of Maui county I would support large and small growers by assisting in policies to enable the implementation of more community supported agricultural programs on all islands within the county excluding Kaho’olawe. These policies would include incentives such as tax breaks for farmers as well as possible homeowners tax reduction for those growing foods at home.



Local Food response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Summary Table

To support our local food security, we need land, water, growers, and incentives.
I will do an immediate assessment of available lands that are within the county’s jurisdiction, seek lands that may be considered for executive order transfers from the state to the county and begin discussions with private land owners for the sale, lease, exchange, partnership or collaboration in making lands available for the growing of food.
Make reclaimed water available to lands identified for food production. Site the reclaimed water storage facilities, tanks or reservoirs adjacent to or in close proximity to the farmlands. Reduce the cost of reclaimed water or provide it free of charge to farmers if their food production is intended to feed our people locally.
Encourage people to become the growers of our food. Educate and encourage the institutional knowledge of our farming communities to inspire a new generation of growers. Supporting agricultural practices, techniques and products to make our soils productive, safe and regenerative.
I will support these directions listed above with practical and innovative ideas that will help implement activities and to provide incentives. Perhaps lands made available for serious growers at reduced or no costs if used for active food production. Make water/reclaimed water available at reduced costs for the growing of food. Our potential is augmented by our ability to be creative thinkers and planners.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Don Couch

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Summary Table

For starters, I would work in to include in the Maui Island Plan a clear determination of our Important Ag Lands. We must determine where our best farm lands are and be ready to protect them against non-farm encroachment. We also have to create new water sources if we are going to promote more ag use. Hard to farm without water.

Community gardens only require small plots of land, a small but adequate appropriation to manage the system, and access to reasonably priced water. The funding can be done simply enough at the Council level, but will have to be managed by the administration. And it first requires a community desire to promote gardens, in the form of dedicated folks dogging these proposals through the legislative process. A Council Member may support these activities, but without robust community support, such ideas can die quickly on the Council floor.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Summary Table

As vice president of the West Maui Sustainability [WMS] group, I helped start the student-hands-on garden at the Princess Nahiene’ena School in Lahaina. I attend the work days and will help plant 30 banana keiki’s on Sat Aug 7 at the school. Currently, WeFarm operates a small organic community garden for the MLP employees, that is very productive in Napili.

WMS, working with WeFarm, will make available an additional 5 acres of land, that is being readied for a community organic garden next Spring.

To assist in preparing the land with a compost site, I contacted all 12 landscapers in West Maui and they are happy to bring us their green waste. WeFarm has one DOH permit for the composting site, and other permits are in the works. Our composting site should be ready this Fall.

I will bring to the Council, personal experience in creating a model of a sustainable community garden [Napili] and working farm [WeFarm.]

The County Council already supports large and small growers and community gardens. Each Community Plan has approved “community gardens.” The “Right to Farm” bill is attached. Thus, I will support each of the County policies that support all levels of farming that are already in place. If there are gaps, I will write and propose bills to close those gaps.

What it takes to make community gardens and farms a reality, is for land owners to give, share or lease their fallow ag land that has access to an abundance of water. The incentives to the ag land owners is that farms and gardens replace dry weeds that are a fire hazard. As a member of the County Council, I can write and get passed an ordinance that requires the land owner of fallow farm land to keep at least 50% in production. Compliance can be met with large and small growers and community gardens.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Summary Table

Defining the word Agriculture is important for land use and water rates. We need to Address Ag lots that don’t produce ag yet pay ag rates. How much money a person puts into actively seeking to produce agriculture is just as important as producing tons of ag. Fair and affordable water allocation is a must for all sized growers. Encouraging and enabling farmers to grow with tax incentives is a must to promote our community into living sustainably like my ancestors before me did. Designate county lands for community gardens. Continue education and publicity to encourage Buy Maui First.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Summary Table

I have and will continue to support land use, ag, water, funding, and planning legislation that makes large and small agricultural projects including community and backyards gardens feasible. If we are to be sustainable we must make ag easier and worthwhile to do. I also like farmers markets and attend regularly.

I will continue to support laws and funding that provide opportunities for agriculture to grow and thrive, including funding for the Farm Bureau and other farm organizations, water policies that help agriculture, permitting for farmer’s markets, and other efforts to increase food security. I would like to see a large increase of agricultural curriculum in the schools. When I was a youngster, we had Future Farmers of America and 4-H was a big part of our lives. We need to do that again. Making it easy for people to grow food will help sustainability-community gardens, ag parks, back yards, etc.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Summary Table

Some years past the Maui County has addressed ways of sustainability through programs such as Focus Maui/sustainability programs which has triggered some participation within the general community but has not hit major goals within the residential communities based upon heavy restrictions that do quote not ‘allow for types of agricultural growth within the residential area’s based upon stringent policies of overgrowth and management and community boards and home owner association rules which has been the downfall of sustainability within our Islands.

We have been working on a legislative Act known as Act 212 of the Aha Moku system which would allow a process that would include Public participation to start a land and ocean management system through traditional management policies which was signed in 2006 by Gov. Linda Lingle. This process would allow for traditional and generational knowledge of land and ocean practices to be implemented into legislation to allow for consideration of these types of practices into County and State Policies. At this very moment we have been going around the different districts having community consultations on fishing management code of conduct, and land management within an Ahupua’a by Kupuna practicioners, to implement the best set of practices that would help alleviate the problems we face today.

We need to look at the needs to allow our populous an opportunity to be sustainable by creating Green Zones within Maui County that would be provided by Development companies since the County is always trying to get more open space for parks and other needs for the public. This will allow the community to create a self sustainable model which in turn would be an opportunity for economic development that could also possibly turn into jobs for the future.

Finally we are starting to change our way of looking ahead, but we also need to look at ways of how our landfills are being overused, our oceans are being overrun by commercial companies, and how any development will disrupt the natural contours of our island way of life.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Summary Table

My family is committed to support of local agriculture. We have managed farmers markets in South, Central and West Maui for over forty years. As a council member I would support all viable community initiatives for community gardens through policies that help make public lands and water available to community groups who commit to starting a garden.

I am already involved personally, as a Haiku school parent, with the formation of a garden at the school as well as volunteering at other school to put in gardens. The Draft Maui Island Plan has policies requiring new subdivisions to have open space set aside that can be used for community gardens. I would make sure that this condition did not get overlooked during the project review process and was incorporated into any final approvals.

I am already working as a private citizen to support negotiations with the large landowners re: leasing lands to small growers. One of my goals is to make sure that small farmers get to have a voice in the county’s farm policies and funding, not just the larger corporate farms. I will support land tax and water rate policies that help small farmers. I will support a food security planning process that identifies current crop production areas, potential crop production areas and crops that are needed on Maui and land where it is possible to grow them.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Summary Table

Supporting local farmers is a major priority of mine. As a former restaurant owner, I always bought local products, but during these tough economic times, price will always be a factor. That is why I support innovative programs such as “Got Choice…Think Local” and “Made on Maui” program, which continually remind residents: we can boost our economy by simply supporting local farmers and businesses.

I will also push to fill and expand the County operated Kula Agricultural Park. This can be done acquiring more land and offering incentives to farmers who keep their products in the local market.
Finally, in any future development, I propose the County require a parcel of land be specifically designated for an open garden area and incorporated into the community before final building approval. This type of space will allow individuals to grow their own food, while also building a more close-knit community.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Summary Table

At one time, the island of Maui grew an abundance of food enough to feed its own citizens and import extra product! To feed the miners in the San Francisco Gold Mines. Since the development of processed food and gigantic super markets, our busy lifestyle, farming has and support of farming has become huge corporate entities. I would like to support community gardens, small backyard farmers/Co-ops and encourage tax incentives for them. While primarily the food grown here would be to feed Maui’s people, there is a need a better system to transport Maui’s produce to the rest of the islands and our products are famous and desirable. I would encourage organic and natural farming methods and I advocate for abundant sources of water be made available to produce wholesome products for personal consumption or market.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Summary Table

The essence in getting someone to do something is to provide them with incentives. This is true in all industries. For someone to buy something they must feel that the thing they are buying is more important that whatever they are trading for it. Ergo Growers MUST grow that which consumers WANT to buy as opposed to growing something and trying to get someone to buy it. The essence her is selling the crops and making a decent wage for one’s work. This is best done thru specialization. That is why AG co-ops are formed. This is best done in the private sector. There a part of the group becomes the professional marketers selling the produce grown by themselves and the others. This frees up most of the growers to concentrate on what they do best…Grow. The key to the whole thing is the demand of the consumers. That demand is often predicated on comparison price. This is true during the ‘Fat’ Times and even truer during the ‘lean’. Products or types of products (e.g. Organic) must be found (or developed thru good marketing) that the people want to buy for the price that the grower is willing to sell. The grower is timed due to the deterioration of the grown items and is stimulated to sell ASAP. Accordingly the council person can probably best help the growers by and their co-ops by staying out of the way and removing as many county hindrances to their business as possible. If something came up to help enhance the Ag business my desire would be to support it.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Summary Table

I hope to set aside tracts of land in different areas, and setup a system where people can use the parcels assigned to them as long as they do not abandon it. Also, the parcel can be passed on to family members.



Local Food response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I completely support our agricultural community which includes large and small growers, and community and backyard gardens. To me, it’s vital that government support our agricultural community as a way to diversify our economy, create jobs, and pursue self-sustainability.

As part of the legislative branch of government – the Maui County Council- we can promote our agricultural community in a number of ways. One way is to place specific conditions on proposed developments requiring actions that promote agricultural communities. For instance, early in 2010 the Council reviewed a HRS Chapter 201-H affordable housing project on Lanai.

I saw to it that a condition was attached that required the Department of Housing and Human Concerns provide land and work with the community to develop a community garden. Another thing that government can do to support agricultural communities, and create jobs at the same time, is to support responsible and planned development, such as development of
water storage reservoirs, reclaimed water lines for irrigation, and agricultural parks.

Government should also work closely with and listen to our agricultural community, including the protection and preservation of important agricultural lands. We should also prioritize the need for water, and give those practicing real agriculture a high priority for available water.

Government must also discontinue the use of injection wells. Not only are injection wells polluting our near-shore waters with high nitrogen levels and pharmaceuticals, destroying our reefs, and killing our marine life, but we could discuss and consider reusing R -1 water for agriculture – at a lower rate – instead of injecting it into injections wells. This could create a new water source for our farmers.



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Summary Table

Fully fund and promote a county agriculture extension service similar to the mainland. I am a gardener myself, and frankly don’t know where to turn to for advice.
Water resources currently are monopolized by a few companies. We need to allocate water first to our farmers, then to those who are not even currently using the water, even if they “own” it.
Allocate water to traditional Hawaiian crops



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Summary Table

I will work to make State-owned land available for easy, inexpensive non-residential lease to bona fide farmers so that everybody who wants to farm has the opportunity to obtain land. This effort will have follow-on effects, for instance supplying cattle feed for Hawaii’s failing dairies, egg farms, and cattle operations.

I will support the organization of producer coops so that farmers will have better access to the marketplace and buyers will have more reliable local supplies.

The vast majority of food consumed today is processed in some way. This means that the crisis of Hawaii agriculture is tied to the near-total absence of food processing businesses. I will work to make low-cost State land available in urban industrial settings for medium and large-scale food processing facilities. I will support efforts to include commercial grade kitchens in smaller business support facilities. I support Act 175 of 2009 which imposes “local-first” requirements for food procurement by the DoE, Department of Corrections, and other state agencies. I will work to make these rules more workable for agencies such as Corrections and for Hawaii’s farmers and food processors large and small.



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

Issue: Local Food    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Summary Table

Former State Land Board chair Michael Wilson mandated “sustainability” as the organization’s touchstone when he took over as head of the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) in 1995. I worked with Mike as his deputy director for four years. One of the major challenges we faced was shifting the mindset of employees within DLNR to embrace the concept as one of the primary assumptions of our mission and to educate and evangelize outside stakeholders (non-profit organizations, other government agencies and the community) about the role of sustainability in the work of DLNR. In short, the conservation and natural resource ethic practiced by a portion of the department and its stakeholders had to be extended to all of DLNR’s program areas. There was some natural resistance to “top-downing” the concept even among program managers who while they accepted and applied “sustainability” as a governing idea.

Sustainability may well require a generational change in outlook, reflected by both consumer behavior–by individuals as well as institutions—and policies. Making “sustainability” part of the community’s life as well as a government policy will requires a combination of educating, engaging and inspiring policy-makers, businesses and residents. Individual members of the community will need to actually begin to live sustainably, and to demand and be willing to bear the costs of government and private institutions applying sustainable practices.

As I did upon being appointed to the State House, I will introduce and support measures and budget provisions that apply sustainability within public institutions—in how we design, construct, maintain and renovate public buildings and infrastructure, in influencing the large amount of products, services and goods the State purchases, and in the policies that are set out in state law and regulations. For example, the bills I proposed in the last two sessions included:
• Act 73 [HB2421] and HB1271 (food and energy security legislation; “barrel tax”)
• Act 53 [HB 2197] (Gives boards of directors authority to install or allow the installation of solar energy or wind energy devices on the common elements of condominiums)
• Act 12 [HB 2427] (makes solid waste plans more useful by changing the interval between revisions of county solid waste management plans from 5 to 10 years).
• HB 2125 (plastic bag ban)
• HB 2926 (allows solar energy facilities on ag lands to be used in connection with ag operations)
• HB 277 (grants for public schools to purchase alternative energy utilities for public school campuses)
• HB 285 (DBEDT and DLNR to work with HNEI/UH-SOEST to work on identifying renewable energy zones in nearshore waters for wave energy conversion facilities)
• HB 287 (establish greenhouse emissions reduction benchmarks to be achieved by January 1, 2020)
• HB 546 (removes capacity limit for net energy metering and increases customer generated capacity)
• HB 794 (facilitates vegetarian meal options in schools)
• HB 892 (creates farm to work program in schools)
• HB 742 (creates recycling programs in schools)
• HB 797 (requires serving fresh local produce at lunches at lease once per week)
• HB 738 (exempts from GET all equipment used directly in electric generation using fuel cells, hydrogen, biomass, wind, solar, ocean, geothermal, waste heat, hydroelectric, or landfill gases) • HB 2037 (increases maximum allowable generating capacity of an eligible customer-generator from 50kw to 100kw, and increases amounts allowed for circuit capacity and peak demand)
• HB 1341 (allows transfer of development rights from lands designated as important ag lands to other districts or parcels)
• HB 1576 (allows Counties to levy additional GET for water and wastewater infrastructure, including reclaimed water pipelines and facilities)

We should also continue to work on the property assessed clean energy (PACE) legislation (i.e., HB 2643) and consider whether the concerns of federal mortgage holders and the counties can be addressed. We should look at mandates (and funding) for renovating and constructing of public facilities for greener construction and design.

Maui developed in the 19th and 20th century as a rural farming community which recruited farming people from other countries as workers for the large plantations operated by the old agribusinesses. In territorial days, food self-sufficiency was foundational for the local workers on the plantations; it’s a way of life still practiced in Maui’s rural (and urbanized) neighborhoods. My classmates at Maui High School included the children of local upcountry farmers who grew cabbages and onions and other local truck crops. My parents purchased a 2-acre agricultural lot in Upcountry Maui and actually wanted to plant crops rather than just build a home there. My grandfather was a fisherman and a gatherer in Ewa Beach on Oahu and on Paia where he settled after retirement. My grandmother kept gardens full of Filipino vegetables like tarong (Japanese egg plant), katudai, paria (bitter melon), various beans, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins and squashes. My mother still grows marungay and katudai on our Kahului homestead which she makes available at farmers’ markets, trades with her friends for other foodstuff, and includes dishes she prepares at home. My wife composts and tends a vegetable garden at our home.

Supporting the viability of agriculture—both large operations and gardens is a constitutional requirement. Supporting local farming and promoting home gardening should be reflected in State and County policies. Statewide, about 15% of our food is grown locally, with approximately 35% of fruits and vegetables grown in the islands. Local farms also preserve green space and a rural way of life even as urbanization encroaches throughout the island.

Leveraging activities that the State must perform to support local agriculture and farming makes sense. The State Department of Education (DOE) is one of the largest purchasers of food products for the public school system meals programs and should use its purchasing power to support locally grown food. The DOE can and should promote healthy food choices in school meals. As I mentioned above, I co-sponsored bills aimed at using the State’s buying power to promote locally grown food: HB 794 (2009) (facilitates vegetarian meal options in schools), HB 892 (2009) (creates farm to work program in schools), HB 797 (2009) (requires serving fresh local produce at lunches at lease once per week). Community groups also should be encouraged to take advantage of locally grown foods. The Maui Food Bank has been increasing availability of fresh, off-grade produce but both the food bank and the agencies that distribute the food needs more capacity for storage— government can help agencies with infrastructure to foster healthier meals for struggling families while making sure that local produce does not go to waste.

Land use policies should be aligned with supporting agriculture by fostering walkable, living communities and healthier lifestyles. I lived in Manoa while working on Oahu where the local City and County recreational area included a community garden where residents could grow their own vegetables. Community gardens have also been allowed on surplus Department of Transportation and Department of Land and Natural Resources lands. Making a portion of County and State lands available for community gardens should be explored with the various landholding agencies (including schools with undeveloped lands). Many of these sites are central to neighborhood pockets. As happened in Manoa, there may be opportunities to use small portions of the larger parks (or the small isolated one-acre parks), the outskirts of schools (Maui High School has acreage that is overgrown with weeds and scrub as well as bananas and other food trees), and undeveloped County and State right of ways within neighborhoods for communal gardens. The County should explore whether property tax rates could be adjusted with credits or other incentives when homeowners dedicate portions of their property for growing food for themselves, or in cooperation with their neighbors. If state legislation is needed to allow the use of association common areas for the same purpose, I would be happy to do so.

In addition to making land available to grow food, farming requires a reliable supply of water at affordable rates. We would need to work with the County administration and the County Council to create a special water rate for community gardens. Another area to explore is providing larger landowners incentives to allow use of portions of their property for community gardens, including some liability protection and perhaps transferring land use rights elsewhere to permanently dedicate lands for agricultural use. We should explore whether there should be disincentives for landowners leaving agricultural land fallow while a contemplating a different or a more urbanized development or use.



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

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Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Summary Table

I certainly believe and support all efforts of agriculture on Maui and will definitely give attention to diversifying agriculture on a large scale to feed our population by using the lands available and seek to negotiate through partnerships w/large land owners to grow our own produce. My focus is to gain sustainability by increasing our exports and decreasing our imports.



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

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Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Summary Table

In the past few years, the legislature has passed landmark legislation on a number of bills that support agriculture from large growers to backyard gardens. In 2005, my first session, we passed the Important Agricultural Lands bill, which requires the state to preserve and protect agricultural lands, increase agriculture self-sufficiency, and insure the availability of agriculturally suitable lands. In 2006 we passed a bill funding improvements to irrigation systems statewide so that farmers have the water they need. More recently, we have focused on pest eradication and invasive species, which threaten crops and prevent farmers from exporting flowers and produce.

Specifically pertaining to local food, I think one of the best bills to come out of the 2009 session was a bill creating a certification program for local farmers and food producers. The program helps develop a trusting relationship between the growers and our island restaurants and hotels. It ensures safe and reliable food from farm to table. It encourages greater use of locally grown produce instead of shipping food in from the mainland. I would like to see continued support for this program.



Local Food response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

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Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Summary Table

I am a member of Farmer’s Union, Maui chapter and I co-founded Slow Food Maui. I researched the availability of fresh produce in Maui’s public schools and wrote an article: http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/525919.html. While working at MCCC as a substance abuse counselor supervisor last summer, I spoke to the warden about planting a garden. I am on the Leadership Committee of Communities Putting Prevention to Work. I will work to create incentives and remove barriers for food farmers to supply for public institutions such as schools, hospitals and prisons (and eventually rehab centers). This is a huge amount of produce and will dramatically increase production.



Local Food response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

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Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Summary Table

As a teacher I do promote agriculture in my class and throughout my curriculum. My class has a garden, and it has provided a comprehensive learning opportunity for my students. If I am elected to the Board of Education, I would like to promote more learning though doing. Schools should be encouraged to grow taro, papaya, bananas and other agricultural products. Students should also be introduced to alternative agriculture like hydroponics and the use of natural fertilizers and pest control methods. The Board of Education should promote the use/consumption of locally grown produce in school lunches (raising awareness of local farm suppliers), promote recycling of compostable materials, and encourage
school gardens.



Local Food response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

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Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

Each local school can be on the same route as the local restaurants having locally grown crops delivered as well as meat, eggs, etc. Also using a program similar to the Kihei school gardens can help supply the lunch program. It is a matter of convincing the BOE that the expense is worth it and the food safety issues are dealt with.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

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Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We need to develop our water resources so water meters can be issued to those who want to grow produce. How can we increase the number of farmers if we don’t increase the availability of water? We also need to increase our invasive species controls so we can produce agricultural products more efficiently. We need to truly expand our use of alternative energies and develop alternative fuel production.

We need to start determining how we are going to use our agricultural lands now and develop goals for our land use.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

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Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Implement policies for the protection of prime agricultural lands in the adopted Maui Island Plan and community plans; (b) Work with the University of Hawaii, Maui College, and VITEC program to offer courses in gardening and back yard farming; (c) Continue promotion of “Made on Maui” products, including locally grown produce; (d) Work with Federal and State partners to develop water source, storage, and transmission facilities for diversified agricultural uses; (e) With assistance from an Agricultural Advisory Committee to the Office of Economic Development, review issues and needs to sustain agriculture, including priorities for marketing and promotion; land use policy issues; shipping and transportation problems; and other related matters.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

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Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Jonathon Olson-Together we need to get all parties to get together and come up with a way for this to occur. I do not believe it is prudent to expect that Maui will ever have 100% sustainability. But we do need to prepare for our future and decide what our vision will be for Maui. The future will bring on challenges as land and home prices increase and farming becomes less viable. As a group we need to come up with balance and ways to keep agriculture as a viable business. I believe as a group we can come up with a comprehensive plan. We will have to be prepared to pay the costs for these plans and look for sources of funding to implement the ideas we come up with. The easiest way to maintain agriculture as a viable business will be to find crops that maintain economic sense for the various locations on the islands. I will listen and work on solutions and allocate resources to the various ideas and provide support, as I feel that we can find a workable balance between development and agriculture. I think we need to educate and assist our residents and help them see the economic benefits of agriculture as a business.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

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Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a 16-year Maui resident who moved here after falling in love with Maui’s nature and beauty I would seek a balance of sustainability and maintaining the environment in a way that preserves it for future generations. Our outdated zoning laws written 50 years ago should be updated to permit mixed use of land for agriculture, residential, and other uses.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

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Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would support, promote and enforce balanced use of land for local needs by ensuring that non local land owners were accountable for ‘holding hostage’ lands that could and should be used to grow food for the citizens. I would take measures to purchase, lease, or condem through eminent domain, such lands that have lay ‘fallow’ for more than 5 years reducing the potential of our small farmers to expand their production.

I would introduce policies to ban the use of agricultural lands for open field testing of genetically modified crops until deemed safe and then only with the understanding that such crops are to benefit ALL citizens of Maui nui, not just a few jobs for a few citizens. I would adjust zoning to accommodate small farms and community supported agriculture.



Land Use response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

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Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Sol Kaho`ohalahala- We need to understand our past if we are going to be innovators of our future. Let us take a closer look at the accomplishments of our kupuna that have inhabited our islands for nearly 2000 years. An understanding of auwai systems that not only transported precious water from one location to another, but to consider that the distribution was fair and restorative. Water used in the lo’i was redirected to its original sources, providing added nutrients for spawning fingerlings in the river course and the estuaries leading to the ocean. Loko ‘ia or fishponds that supported the production of fresh fish in abundance is a Hawaiian invention found nowhere else in the world. It supports the concept of ‘aina momona or the fattening of the land of which will sustain its people. The intricacies of these systems demonstrates a keen understanding of plant and animal life forms, their relationship to their environments and ecosystems and how they are replenished, restored, and perpetuated in a process that we understand as sustainable. The examples are in our past. We need to acknowledge them, embrace them and begin to implement them with our own creative and innovative thinking while utilizing the best advancements of our time. These directions speak to a balanced approach for any issue or idea to better our current conditions while being environmentally attuned.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Don Couch

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Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

1) Set aside our important ag lands for the future. 2) Develop new water sources. 3) Protect the economic incentives already in the property tax codes to promote farm use. 4) Create a county diversified agricultural policy that will seek to protect the interests of small-scale local farmers and backyard growers.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

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Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

The new Council in 2011 will have the task of approving nine Maui Island plans [2011- 2030] based on recommendations by GPAC, the Planning department, the Planning Commission and the public. If elected to the Council, I will vote for land use plans that protect community character, the preservation of agriculture, open space and cultural and natural resources.
Support for environmentally sensitive design comes from Hawaii state law. One law is the Hawaii Revised Statutes Chapter 205 Land Use Commission. I will apply the laws that support balanced use of land for local needs such as:

Excerpt: HRS 205 (d) Agricultural districts shall include: Activities or uses as characterized by the cultivation of crops, crops for bioenergy, orchards, forage, and forestry;
(2) Farming activities or uses related to animal husbandry, and game and fish propagation;
(3) Aquaculture, which means the production of aquatic plant and animal life within ponds and other bodies of water;
(4) Wind generated energy production for public, private, and commercial use;
(5) Biofuel production as described in section 205-4.5(a)(15) for public, private, and commercial use;
(6) Bona fide agricultural services and uses that support the agricultural activities of the fee or leasehold owner of the property and accessory to any of the above activities, whether or not conducted on the same premises as the agricultural activities to which they are accessory, including but not limited to farm dwellings as defined in section 205-4.5(a)(4), employee housing, farm buildings, mills, storage facilities, processing facilities, vehicle and equipment storage areas, roadside stands for the sale of products grown on the premises, and plantation community subdivisions as defined in section 205-4.5(a)(12);
(7) Wind machines and wind farms;
(8) Small-scale meteorological, air quality, noise, and other scientific and environmental data collection and monitoring facilities occupying less than one-half acre of land; provided that these facilities shall not be used as or equipped for use as living quarters or dwellings;
(9) Agricultural parks;
(10) Agricultural tourism conducted on a working farm, or a farming operation as defined in section 165-2, for the enjoyment, education, or involvement of visitors; provided that the agricultural tourism activity is accessory and secondary to the principal agricultural use and does not interfere with surrounding farm operations; and provided further that this paragraph shall apply only to a county that has adopted ordinances regulating agricultural tourism under section 205-5; and
(11) Open area recreational facilities.
Agricultural districts shall not include golf courses and golf driving ranges, except as provided in section 205-4.5(d).



Land Use response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

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Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

There twelve mokus on Maui. Each moku has it’s own natural and cultural features that dictate what is sensibly grown in that area. Looking to the past to guide our future is important. We have strayed so far off course with developments, water diversions and improper use of lands. It’s time to address this within our update of the General Plan 2030.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

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Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I will carefully examine all LU proposals involving ag lands to determine if they will reduce our need to import food & other products and if they are feasible, work for passage so we can reduce our dependence on imports. It is important to protect IALs.

Not knowing the specific land use policies and zoning that is being referred to, I can generally say that I respect IALs and will continue to work to find balance between needed development and agriculture. At the present time, I think there is a lot of land that can be used for agriculture if water can be made available.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

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Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a farmer myself, I have had difficulties on how we would be able to manage, especially in today’s generation, our children are at a cataclysmic point, they cannot decide what to do for they are faced with too many distractions, that we the parents fear, who carry the kuleana tomorrow.

From the traditions of all culture, we need to look at ways on how we can fill that responsibilities again, we need to encourage generational knowledge to instill pride within our use, for they are the future that will be the deciding factor on sustainable growth tomorrow. We’ve had programs within our Department of Education system that stressed the important on a Agriculture, Animal husbandry, and other needed grass rooted programs, then from what is grown are sold to the community to help stimulate the schools programs like Lahainaluna High School with its Dormitory programs which almost got cut by the Department of education. I would fight for those types of programs because I understand the benefits.

Start with the children. Incorporate more mandatory educational programs that would allow the children more opportunities to go to the areas of practice such as Taro patch projects, fish pond restoration projects, Canoe Associations to learn about Traditions on Sailing and survival and not just talk about how an ahupua’a is, but allow them to go to those places and be involved with these types of projects, without being hindered by DOE Liability Policies, that would also support Green Zones with the Maui Island Populous and incorporate it within the general plan.

And for your question on enforce balance. We are living on an island in the middle of the Pacific ocean with the most productive resource nowhere else in the world and if the Land Designation is Ag, then should we review its Land use policies and reconsider the uses. I say no, would I allow the Ag lands not to be required to their uses and still allow their taxes to be less than the residential Tax, I still say no.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

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Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I strongly support community planning that revolves around local self-sufficiency in food, energy and rural economic opportunities.
I support ag use mixed with home-based businesses, as long as the businesses are compatible to the neighborhood. I support creation of traditional village planning guidelines so we are not trying to fit places like Keanae or Kahakuloa into a model that does not fit the land or the community’s vision. I support using community block grant funds in qualifying rural areas to help establish decentralized services in these communities, such as better non-vehicle transportation routes, better water systems, community centers with certified kitchens and ag support facilities.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

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Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

If Maui County is to maintain its unique character and avoid urban sprawl, we must take a strong stand on planning. The Maui Island Plan is currently in the works and I support it moving into the final implementation stage. This plan ultimately helps us to define our specific growth areas and protects our most culturally sensitive areas. Once finalized, I believe it should be maintained and alternations should not be allowed unless excruciating circumstances arise as deemed by the County Council.
The County at the same time must also incorporate smart growth strategies into its land use policies. One possible solution is having many of our new developments blend residential and commercial space (mixed use) together in order to minimize the need for a vehicle. Inevitably, growth must occur to meet the demands of our growing population, but there is no reason why we cannot do it in a strategic fashion through smart policies.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

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Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I support the full review of Land Use policies and the setting aside of ag lands in the General Plan that defines growth in the area of the support and development of liveable communities. I really like the concept of farm to table and will support measures to encourage those programs. Saving gas, time, money while producing abundantly healthy food is a priority for Maui County.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

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Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Not all AG zoned land is equal. I think that the prime grades of land should be reserved for AG use and the lower grades be used for other purposes. I support co-p Ag deliveries as well as marketing.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

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Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Protect ag land from development. Help farmers by providing water at reasonable cost. Make sure no GMO in Maui County.



Land Use response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

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Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I completely support growing the food we need sustainably and reducing the need for unnecessary travel.

With regards to minimizing unnecessary travel, one thing that we can do as Councilmembers is to support “walkable communities”. By preserving and enhancing our small-towns by not allowing sprawl to connect towns together (i.e. allowing development in-between and connecting Waikapu, Wailuku, and Waihee) we can have communities where our homes, work places, shops and businesses are in close proximity to one another.

As current chair of the Public Services Committee, one thing that I did to promote this was to amend the Residential Workforce Housing ordinance (Chapter 2.96, Maui County Council) by adding an incentive for developers to construct affordable units “on-site” as versus “off-site”. Specifically, the code was amended to reduce the workforce housing requirement for certain “on-site” development from 40 percent to 25 percent. With regards to promoting the growing of food we need sustainably, one thing that I did during the recent budget session was to introduce a proposal that added positions for Ag-verification.

I am not supportive of Ag sub-divisions (also known as “Gentlemen’s Estates”), however this means that the County would have added positions to go out and verify that homeowners on existing Ag land (i.e. Ag sub-divisions) are actually doing agriculture.



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

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Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

1. Raise property taxes on land that is not being used for sustainable crops
2. Partner with current landowners to produce a plan for sustainability in land use.



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

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Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I will work to make State-owned land available for easy, inexpensive non-residential lease to bona fide farmers so that everybody who wants to farm has the opportunity to obtain land. I support efforts to promote “infill” or “brownfield” development of already-urbanized areas as a source of affordable housing, retail, and small business facilities. This, in turn, will reduce development pressures on agricultural land and shoreline land.
The development of affordable housing is a priority. With Na Hale o Maui, I am currently working to develop affordable housing so that working families will be able to plan a future on Maui.
Regarding “unnecessary travel”: approximately 12% of Maui residents are currently forced to regularly fly to Oahu or even the mainland for routine medical appointments. I support efforts to build a non-profit hospital run by a charitable foundation in Kihei. We need to bring doctors into Maui not chase them out. I support Sen. Josh Green’s legislation last session to transfer HHSC hospitals to the control of non-profit foundations. I support tort reform. I will lobby the US Congress for an increase in Medicare/Medicaid remuneration to Hawaii physicians and hospitals. I support funding for community based efforts to bring in primary care and specialist physicians and assist them in launching their practice.



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

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Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

The County will be adopting a new General Plan which incorporates urban growth boundaries for the first time. One long-term debate should be whether Rural should become the future major land use district rather than Urban for Maui’s population centers. In concept, urban growth to fill in areas with existing infrastructure makes good sense.
However, planning and zoning, as I mentioned above, should be based on walkable, living communities and healthier lifestyles, and not governed by the use of the car. This means reflecting on the kind of neighborhoods where a car is not required for work, shopping, and recreation. There should be flexibility in allowing different uses within zoning districts (perhaps creating hybrid zoning districts which foster more rural uses) to promote self-contained communities. Trade-offs in density, transfer of development rights from lands designated as important agricultural lands to other districts or parcels, and other tools for preserving open spaces and agricultural lands should be made available.
As I suggest in my response to the first question, there should be incentives and protection for farmers to farm (i.e., financing sources for equipment and supplies, cheaper rates for reliable water sources), and perhaps some disincentives to large landowners who would otherwise prefer to let the land lie fallow. The Tri-Isle Resource Conservation and Development Council, a non-profit organization, has been implementing federal grants for the Molokai Ag Development and Maui Ag Development programs—those grants allow small and start-up farmers to obtain equipment and assistance. The State, as the economy improves, could consider a similar grant program.
Finally, the State, if the Counties do not, should move forward on implementing the long-neglected important agricultural lands (IAL) concept of the 1978 Hawaii State Constitution. The State legislature, in the interest of homerule, deferred to the Counties to move forward on IAL and to private landowners to voluntarily commit to IAL designation. Few landowners have come forward so far to designate any of its holdings as IAL—A&B did so with some of its sugar lands. In addition, farmers are not getting long-term leases for existing agricultural lands.



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

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Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a former planning commissioner and chair, I believe I understand the zoning processes, and government’s duty to work for the people and their communities. Again, we need to negotiate and partner with the private land owners. There are projects started in Hawaii, aimed at creating renewable energy and alternatives to fossil fuel that are environmentally sound and I will support and encourage them.



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

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Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As mentioned above, the Important Agricultural Lands bill will help preserve the land we need for agricultural purposes. The implementation of this bill is based on policies set in 1978 by our State Constitution. In addition, I’d like to see a review of our State and County plans before determining what policies and zoning will need to be adjusted. Specifically, I’d like to see greater integration of Tourism and Agriculture as it is so clear that our ability to attract visitors is tied to our natural resources and beautiful, clean environment. I’ve always thought Upcountry Maui had the potential to be marketed much like Napa in California



Land Use response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

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Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a State (as opposed to County) legislator, I won’t have day-to-day purview over which land is developed and which is retained in agriculture. On the broader level I will support agricultural land based on IAL classifications (A-D). For instance, in my district, Kihei, we need to build a high school. The land where DOE wants to build it is classified as “D” (barren and kiawe brush). For land with this designation, a high school has higher priority than leaving it in low quality grazing land. With highly fertile (A and B) classification land, every incentive should be given to support those who do want to farm, but are currently failing.
Also there are ways of developing (cluster subdivisions) that retain agriculture while at the same time, providing housing.



Land Use response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

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Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life.
To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility.
As an educational model, students need to be educated about the impact of expansion (land development) on food and water sources. This ties into most basic geography courses, where a study and understanding of Human-Environment Interaction helps the students to better understand how they directly affect the world in which they live. Maybe they will be moved to develop some other model of development that is more environmentally friendly.



Land Use response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

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Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.
Because of special provisions for schools for agriculture and vocational programs, the school can utilize land for all levels of agriculture. Part of the green design allows for rooftop gardens in addition to land around the school and offsite possibilities.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

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Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Maui County must work with the various alternative energy producers and create storage capabilities for firm power. I would propose a partnership in creating a battery storage facility. The County could lead the way by creating the battery storage facility, then prorating the cost to each of the alternative energy producers as their customers tie into the system.

The County also needs to convert each of its own facilities that consume a lot of traditional energy into facilities that use alternative energy.

We need to change all County policies that do not allow an alternative energy source into policies that do allow them.

We need to work for change at the State Legislature that would require the public, the private sector, and government to use more alternative energy sources. We must require the utility companies to accept a greater amount of alternative energy sources.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

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Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Expand use of photovoltaic or other alternate energy systems at County facilities to reduce electrical power costs (e.g. the Department of Water Supply spends about $15 million per year on electrical power); (b) Fast track alternate energy projects through the County permitting process.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

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Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I believe we are just at the beginning of our technological explosion for renewable resources. I believe we can begin to implement solutions that will reduce our dependence on non-renewable resources. I believe we can start by reducing wasteful practices and by recycling and responsible use of our precious resources. By using current technology and ideas and the future technological ideas that will come in the future we can reduce our dependence. I think education is most important and then we can offer incentives such as tax or reduced expenditures costs to get people on board. I feel that the people on Maui are some of the brightest people and that they will show and implement ways for all of us to succeed at this. I think we should require this of all new construction and gradually assist current homeowners to install these devices by loans or gov’t funding programs. Hopefully we will make it so lucrative to do, that penalties or enforcement will not be necessary. It is the right thing to do.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

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Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We obviously need to wean ourselves from our addiction to oil as it’s a dwindling resource that’s running out worldwide and costs a lot to ship to our islands. I personally drive a hybrid vehicle, a Toyota Prius, and would favor lobbying the state for tax incentives for hybrid vehicles and renewable energies such as wind and solar farms. While doing this may cost us a little more in the short-term it would pay dividends in the long-run. Maui would be an ideal place to prototype creative solutions using our abundant natural resources and communal willingness.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

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Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

One specific incentive that I would promote would be major tax reduction for homeowners who install solar water heaters and photo voltaic panels on their homes. I would also enforce strong penalties to businesses that are not moving toward solar power by 2012.



Energy response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

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Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Renewable energy is our future. To begin, we must consider and decide which energy solutions are best suited for who we are, where we are, what our current power needs are and how we plan for future generations of keiki yet unborn. We will be required to retool Federal, State and County laws and regulations that are antiquated, obsolete and prevent us from advancing our goals for energy solutions. The state Public Utilities Commission policies and authority will need to be revisited to support retooling along with consumer advocacy support. Renewable energy must be tangible to our families, demonstrated in its cost savings and value over the long term and make sense in its environmental support both locally and globally. Educating our communities about a “green future” includes an understanding and need to become familiar with terms like “carbon footprint” and its significance in shifting our current views and mindsets to “thinking globally and acting locally.” Solar heating, photovoltaic and wind generated power must be integrated in future development projects as standard infrastructure requirements. Water catchment systems, grey water plumbing, anaerobic digesters, amended soils and reclaimed water reuse will become common terminologies and practices required in our future. Renewable energy resources to produce hydrogen fuel cells to power public transportation alternatives for Maui Nui and for personal automobiles must be explored for their placement here in Hawaii. Visiting systems already in use in Iceland, an island nation, collaborating with the islands of Maui Nui is a good next step. I want to lead that charge for our county’s betterment.



Energy response by County Council candidate Don Couch

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Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

For transportation: more mass transit, more focus on walkable community development, more bikeways connecting kids to schools, residents to work, visitors to the beach, etc. Let’s reduce our utter dependency on the car.

For general energy: allow more low-grade, backyard technologies such as small windmills and heavier PV/solar use. If it is not policy already, I would require every new home to come solar ready.



Energy response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

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Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I support the renewable energy programs currently in place. I have spoken to representatives from the programs described below, and the programs are well funded and in varying stages of completion.

Hawaiian Electric company [MECO on Maui] has a website with the following info: Excerpt: The U.S. Department of Energy, though the University of Hawaii, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Navy will receive $4 million annually over several years to help HC&S determine whether it is feasible within the next ten years to convert the more than 130-year-old company into an “energy farm,” or a high-tech producer of renewable fuels.
The decision could result in HC&S growing sweet sorghum or tropical grasses or perhaps green sugar cane, which does not require the unpopular practice of cane burning to harvest the crop.
Found at: Hawaiian Electric Co (2005-2010) Hawaii’s Energy Future: Renewable Energy Sources <http://www.hawaiisenergyfuture.com/articles/Biomass.html&gt;

There is a model of an 18-unit subdivision designed with renewable energy in Waianae Valley, Oahu. Excerpt: All homes include energy-efficient features such as solar water heating, photovoltaic panels to generate electricity, and energy-efficient lighting and appliances. The subdivision was designed to have no electricity costs. These three and four bedroom homes will be anchored by Hale Kumuwaiwai (community resource) that allows opportunities for community members to produce and prepare their own foods, share knowledge and recreate.
In order to be a successful community, all community members must work together to develop, maintain and manage the community resources. While this subdivision may not be for everyone, it is a great opportunity for those families committed to a sustainable lifestyle. At this time the infrastructure and homes are in the building stage. See:: Department of Hawaiian Home Lands http://hawaii.gov/dhhl/kaupuni

For penalties to be effective, they must be enforced. In Hawaii the common practice is to single out one law breaker and punish them. It is believed that this practice serves as a warning to others in a similar situation, and will cause them to stop illegal activities. In reality, what we see occurring is, the law breaker will do illegal activities, such as illegal dumping, at night when they can be caught.

I prefer to work with everyone to do the right thing, especially since enforcement is so limited.
I have found that ‘voluntary compliance’ works in most cases, especially when we work with them. A case in point, is when I was working with Dept of Health [DOH] on Maui to stop sugar cane smoke from disrupting the lives of asthmatics and others. The sugar companies complied with the Right to Farm bill, and in addition, voluntarily provided public notice before burning sugar cane. They also limited night burns to one burn per month. This was a major improvement over the sugar cane burns that occurred without notice any time day or night.

Another example is when I was working with the EPA on Maui to stop sewage spills. As a result, the Mayor at the time [Linda Lingle] made $25 million in sewage infrastructure improvements and the spills were reduced dramatically.



Energy response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

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Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Getting Maui Electric Company (MECO) to buy into upgrading their system to allow more people to tie into their grid. Work with State and federal entities to purchase renewables at bulk rate to help drive the cost down for consumers. Mandate new developments to be renewable energy minded in their plans. Solar, wind, wave & reuse recycled water is a must.
FYI- I live off-the grid in Honolua Valley with Wind, solar and rain catch. I know it’s doable!



Energy response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

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Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Lessening our dependence on fossil fuels is a no-brainer. However, each alternative energy proposal must be carefully evaluated to decide what the pros and cons are. I do believe we need to speed up our efforts to get pilot projects going and hope that county administration will do that next term. Council can assist with expediting entitlements and funding.we have been talking about biofuels for several years and need to get it going.

I will support feasible demonstration projects that will help us decide what biofuels and other alternative energy projects we can grow to lessen our need for fossil fuels. Again, without a clear understanding of what “normal activities” you refer to, I need more information to make a good decision. Alternatives must be carefully examined and evaluated.



Energy response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

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Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I myself live off the grid and have experienced the major difficult times, but when you are self dependent you learn to live life day by day, on the needs and wants, especially raising 4 children, who have children of their own, you think of ways that would accommodate the life and not the luxury but enjoy its own bountifulness.

I can see the use of the sun as a means of energy, but I don’t see that we allow for an intrusive structure such as a 14 story building to study the sun one they already have built alternative research stations around the world.

I am totally for use of recycled wastewater and am totally against injection wells.

Wind energy yes, but my answers would be that the materials that are used are also recyclable products in case of breakdown, and that the energy is used for the general populous and not be sent out.



Energy response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

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Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I support Maui county leading the way to convert its most costly energy demands (water and wastewater treatment facilities) to renewable production. This will likely involve partnerships with private providers. I also support the capture of methane from landfills to help create useable fuel.

On the domestic front I support a PACE type program where the county offers home owners the option of financing installation of renewable energy generation through small installments added to property tax. This will create jobs and make solar and wind energy available to middle and even low-income families.

As far as incentives, I support continuation of tax credits for renewables, with a special outreach to large energy consumers such as businesses in high-energy consumption areas. Although it is a state issue, I do believe the county can do more to loosen the restrictions currently placed on net metering contracts. I’m not an expert at these things, but from what I have heard, the Feed-in Tariff proposal at the PUC could open a new era.

I also support an energy audit of county facilities and a five year plan to retrofit these facilities with energy efficient fixtures, since the payback time in energy savings is usually very short term. We should also welcome partnerships such as the effort by Blue Planet foundation to exchange thousands of light bulbs for energy efficient models on Molokai.

I also support the increased research into biofuels for local transportation use, especially those derived from materials that would otherwise be considered waste.



Energy response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

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Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I have a strong belief that Maui County has the potential to be a leader in renewable energy. In order to accomplish this, we must do two things; the first is developing a friendly business climate for energy companies to introduce new technologies. The second is then offering incentives to residents who take advantage of cutting edge energy solutions, such as installing photovoltaic panels or windmills on their property. I plan on making these strategies a reality by budgeting for programs that offer tangible incentives through tax breaks and faster permitting.

The County must also be a leader in developing partnerships with energy companies to implement more education and incentives for switching to energy saving appliances and fixtures.

I know in the short term, renewable energy will be costly for the County because of tax breaks, funding for staff and programs to make renewable energy take off, but in the long run, I know it will benefit Maui County immensely. Hundreds of new jobs will be created and energy has the potential to be less expensive. Most importantly, Maui Nui will be preserved for generations to come. I am adamant that we must make the investments today in order for us to see large returns in the future.



Energy response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

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Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Maui County in it’s energy policies must spell out incentives, rewards, credits, and benefits of developing renewable sources of energy. The earth cannot sustain our lifestyle using fossil fuels and our future depends on our ability to attract companies to grow bio-crops and other renewal sources of energy.



Energy response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

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Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I have recommended that Maui adopt the PACE system (Berkeley Model) of using bond borrowing (after state and Fed tax credits and payback thru property tax to effect change to solar and wind energy. I have proposed to use the Land Fill methane for 1 to 3 megawatts of (continuous) generated power. I have proposed to use the H-power system to reduce the landfill by 90% and generate 7% of Maui’s electricity by burning combustibles at the Landfill.



Energy response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

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Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Encourage wind and solar projects. Must be done with Maui Electric Company to ensure reliable power at all times.



Energy response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

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Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I believe self-sustainability is essential. For me, sustainability means assuring that our present and future generation’s needs will be taken care of by implementing the use of energy efficient material, alternative energy and renewable resources, waste reduction, water collection and conservation, and supporting local farming, and small business. For me, it also means preserving our local culture and especially the traditions of our host-culture – the Hawaiian people.

Unfortunately, government has done little to promote alternative energy in Maui County. I would make this a priority as PV, solar, wind energy and other such alternatives are available.

As I mentioned earlier, I believe that we can diversify our economy and create jobs with responsible and planned development such as developing alternative energy projects.



Energy response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

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Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

1. As far as I am concerned, we need as many windmills on the West Maui Ridge as can fit. If the wind company has access to a battery storage system, that would make wind even more attractive.
2. Maui is in a unique position to convert sugar land to bio-fuels.



Energy response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

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Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Haleakala may provide Maui with a source of geothermal electricity. I will support feasibility studies. I support incentives for individual homeowners and small businesses to install solar systems, LED lighting (CFL’s contain mercury and are harmful to the enviroment) and replace energy gobbling older appliances in order to reduce their consumption of fossil-fuel electricity from the grid. I will continue to support research and development efforts to test the feasibility of other alternative energy sources such as ocean-generated electricity. Development of subsurface water resources may have hydroelectric generation potential as well.



Energy response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

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Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Hawaii relies on imported oil for more than 90% of our energy needs. About 5% of Hawaii’s total energy comes from “renewable” sources. The remainder is fossil fuel-based and some estimates are that Hawaii pays outside sources up to $7 Billion annually (78% imported from foreign countries, and 22% from domestic sources, principally Alaska). About 8% of electricity generated is from renewable sources. We need to end this addiction if we are going to make sure transportation and electricity remain affordable into the future when the price of oil skyrockets. The cost of solar, wind, wave and geothermal is stable, and likely will remain constant no matter how expensive oil gets. The State has already launched the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, a project with a goal of making Hawaii’s energy use 70% renewable by 2030. It is a lofty goal, and it has already run into setbacks as the economy crashed and funding dried up.

As I private lawyer, I assisted the local promoters of the Kaheawa Wind Farm project in obtaining certain State permits. In the last two sessions of the legislature, I supported the food and energy security bill to provide funding for projects promoting Hawaii’s food and energy independence (Act 73 [HB2421] and HB1271 (food and energy security legislation; “barrel tax”)).

I also supported the Clean Energy Bond bill (HB2643 (2010)), the property assessed clean energy (PACE) bill. A large hurdle to installing solar panels on private homes is the up-front cost of installation. PACE would allow the state to pay for and install solar panels for homeowners, who would then pay down the cost over time through a simple added assessment on their property taxes while saving on utility costs. This would open the door to solar energy for regular homeowners who otherwise could not afford it. We should work on the concerns expressed late in the process by stakeholders (the Counties who would implement the property tax process, and financial institutions concerned about losing the priority of their security interest in the properties using the bond financing) in future legislative sessions. I also introduced or sponsored the following proposals:
• HB 2926 (allows solar energy facilities on agricultural lands to be used in connection with agricultural operations on that property)
• HB 277 (grants for public schools to purchase alternative energy utilities for public school campuses)
• HB 285 (DBEDT and DLNR to work with HNEI/UH-SOEST to work on identifying renewable energy zones in nearshore waters for wave energy conversion facilities)
• HB 287 (establish greenhouse emissions reduction benchmarks to be achieved by January 1, 2020)
• HB 546 (removes capacity limit for net energy metering and increases customer generated capiacity)
• HB 738 (exempts from GET all equipment used directly in electric generation using fuel cells, hydrogen, biomass, wind, solar, ocean, geothermal, waste heat, hydroelectric, or landfill gases).
• HB 2037 (increases maximum allowable generating capacity of an eligible customer-generator from 50kw to 100kw, and amounts allowed for circuit capacity and peak demand).

I also supported and voted for Act 201 [SB 2817](2010) (allowing condominium homeowner associations to locate or allow alternative energy devices on common area property), Act 186 [SB 2231] (2010) (prohibiting prevention of the installation of electric vehicle charging stations in multi-family and townhouse parking areas), Act 175 [SB 2563] (2010) (Authorizes the director of business, economic development, and tourism to impose and collect fees for the administration of the solar water heater system variances. Sets the goal of using alternative fuels to meet 30 per cent of highway fuel demand by 2030).



Energy response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

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Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

There are numerous renewable sources and alternatives to fossil fuel being introduced to our communities. I support the need to quickly transition to renewable sources of energy and will absolutely take a pro active stand on this viable subject.



Energy response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

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Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As you may know, we just passed the Barrel Tax bill that addresses this problem. While controversial because it raises the tax on a barrel of oil by $1, the funds raised will go towards programs that put Hawaii on that transition path to renewable sources of energy, and also for food sustainability. I think we should continue to build upon this important bill. At this time, 40% of the funds raised will for energy and food security, and 60% to the general fund. However, within that 60%, the general fund is used for most of our existing energy related programs.

I would prefer to use incentives rather than penalties as a way to change behavior at this time. I think our schools are doing a good job of educating our children on the importance of saving energy and decreasing our dependence on fossil fuel. I believe that upcoming generations will focus on using new technologies and scientific research to achieve energy and food sustainability.



Energy response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

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Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

The new law requiring solar hot water in all new housing construction needs to be tightened up to eliminate loop-holes (natural gas), ensuring at the same time that there is flexibility to allow for innovation in the renewable energy field. (not designating what exact technology is allowed since new, improved technology is continuing to be developed).

Also I favor ensuring that in addition to promoting renewable energy, local control (including individual home-owners) of the means of power is increased and maintained.



Energy response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

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Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life.
To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility.

Schools should be encouraged to utilize alternative sources of energy. For example, there are currently 2 government sponsored incentives to install solar and/or photovoltaic energy systems. Utilizing these incentives, schools can lower their monthly electrical bills, recoup the price of the system within 7 years, and lessen their affect on the environment. We should tap into the methane generated by the landfill to power generators to offset the expanding population. At the high school level, we should sponsor competition and/or scholarships for students willing to investigate energy generation like wave and wind power. Kids tend to think out of the box. Cultivate their creative minds, promoting the use of energy for today and tomorrow for their use and the use of their children. We are all consumers and stakeholders, so we should seek more minds in addressing this issue.



Energy response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

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Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

New schools are being built with alternative energy and modified usage as a major part of the design. Remodeling existing schools also use the new designs for energy savings. this is being encouraged by BOE due to energy costs.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

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Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We have adequate amounts of water; we just need to manage the resources that we have. We need to realistically look at cost increases but if we balance the use of agricultural water with domestic water use, the rate increases should be reasonable.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

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Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Develop and implement a comprehensive plan for water reuse in agricultural irrigation, including retention of storm water and use of R-1 treated water in lieu of disposal in injection wells; (b) Establish water rates in consideration of the regional cost of production with subsidies for agricultural water use; (c) Develop groundwater and expand storage facilities to supply domestic and diversified agricultural needs.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

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Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I believe the County of Maui should take over all the resources and management of water as this is such a critical issue to the people and the islands. We will have to pay for this, but I think it is imperative that it occurs. Then we can better manage and set policies to benefit all of Maui and the people. We will have to strategize and help homeowners and businesses and farmers better utilize our precious resource. We will need to come up with creative solutions that will be possible to implement. We will not be able to point fingers but we will have to come up with the solutions and also come up with ways to finance these ideas. I believe we will eliminate injection wells and we can do an analysis on the cost to pump verse reclaim and find a workable solution between the two.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

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Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As I mentioned earlier developing more water sources is one of my top 3 issues for the county. I would fund capital improvement projects to build pipelines to transport water from East Maui and possibly with creative solutions from the West Maui mountains, the location of the 2nd rainiest spot on earth. After all as the Department of Water Supply reminds us “By water all things find life.” I would also increase the tiered water price structure to incentivize water conservation.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

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Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would first of all need to get a definition of “Fair agricultural use of water” clearly spelled out, then I would enforce the use of ag water by intoducing policies providing the use of ag water for the production of foods to be consumed in Maui county, by human residents FIRST. I would introduce penalties to water users that are on ag land and not growing or producing on that land. I would also create jobs by implementing a water task force to observe leaks, misuse, and abuse of our water resources and enforce the law by issuing citations to those water abusers, there by creating revenues for the county.

I would put a 10 year hold on ALL new water meter applications in order to give our fresh water aquifers time to recharge, especially on Moloka’i where the drought of many years is evident. Would provide incentives to homeowners to include water catchment systems in areas that produce enough rain to be harvested. I would also make use of the ‘waste water’ by turning it into a valuable resource by introducing technology such as microbial wastewater treatment systems.



Water response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

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Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Water is life, Ka wai ola. Immediately, I would begin putting in place the necessary infrastructure and storage facilities to utilize our reclaimed water. Currently, we dump and dispose 80% of our reclaimed water into injection wells in Kahului, Kihei and Lahaina. Treated to R-1 and R-2 levels will support its reuse, but we lack a distribution system to make the reclaimed water available to potential users. This is the lowest hanging fruit in the efficient use of reclaimed water. Delivering this water to farmers to grow food is a goal and may be considered an incentive. We must allow for water catchments systems that allow for the storage rainwater for other uses. Cross contamination issues need to be resolved. Policies for the use of grey water will be implemented to allow for multiple use of the same drop of water. Change in current policies will also determine enforcement and penalties. If we want to encourage the reuse of water, we need to support our communities with policies and incentives vs. penalties and fines. Government needs to become friendly to the people we serve. Water devices that are intended for conservation and efficiencies must be required for retrofits or conversions. Low flow toilets must be installed. We provide incentives or real property tax credits as a result of these conversions. We need to look at watershed protection and restoration as a long-term investment toward water resources replenishment, recharge and supply. New resource development has to consider the efficient power requirements for the transmission and pumping of wells. The use of renewables needs to be implemented. Lastly, we need to consider placing the ownership of our water under County government to ensure the fair and equitable distribution of our water. It is a public resource.



Water response by County Council candidate Don Couch

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Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

It is essential that we create additional sources. Our community is planned to grow another 40,000 in the next 20 years and there is no way that you are going to conserve enough of the existing source to provide enough water for new homes, businesses and farms. To the degree economically reasonable and responsible, we need to maximize our use of our existing R-1 water resource. I would also support a heavier tiered water billing system so that when a homeowner decides to turn his home in a dry area into a lush tropical garden, the cost will be severe. Price will drive conservation.



Water response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

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Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I support former Councilwoman Michelle Anderson’s WR-13 Water Availability Bill, aka “Show me the Water” bill, which passed in December 2007. This is an excellent document that requires that developers who want to build a subdivision or condominiums will first have to prove to Maui County they have a long-term source of water.

I support groups like Maui Tomorrow and Sierra Club that take legal action to obtain pono decisions in diverted water disputes, and water entitlements.

State law requires the Commission on Water Resource Management to protect the stream’s natural resources and traditional uses [taro farming, to provide habitat for aquatic life, etc.] before providing water to “off-stream” users who divert water for business [sugar cane production, etc] or residential purposes.

Excerpt – On June 10, 2010, the state Commission on Water Resource Management ordered 12.5 million gallons of water per day to be restored to the Na Wai Eha streams. For the other streams, flows below the diversions would be set at:
* Waihee stream would be restored to 10 million gallons per day (mgd.)
* North Waiehu stream would get 1.6 mgd.
* South Waiehu stream would get 0.9 mgd.
* Iao and Waikapu streams would remain at current levels.
About 60 million to 70 million gallons per day are currently diverted from Na Wai Eha streams to HC&S sugar and only 12.5 million gallons per day will go to local farmers. By its majority decision, the Commission did not restore the state’s public water resource to traditional uses. [See <http://www.mauinews.com/page/content.detail/id/532367.html?showlayout=0>%5D
When these types of faulty decisions are made, the County can work with the State to remedy such errors.



Water response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

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Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Water is not to be wasted. Rain / Storm water needs to be caught. We need new reservoirs & existing ones relined, the ditch system needs to be upgraded, new water sources created and reclaimed water utilized instead of injection wells. The Water Department needs more oversight and needs to build positive working relationships with the private sector. The Public Trust Doctrine needs to be upheld. As a Kuleana Land owner with no water, I live with the unfairness everyday.



Water response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

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Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Water is the top priority if we are to get our economy going again. Our Water Dept needs to make conservation and source development happen. Strict conservation laws with tough penalties for abuse and incentives for reduced use must be implemented. Building a
dam to create a natural reservoir would be a cost effective and fast way to provide storage. Use of gray water must be made allowable, using catchment along with a meter must be made legal, and recycled water has to be used where possible to save potable water for human consumption. I have introduced gray water bills at the State level and will continue to pursue all answers to solve our water “shortage”. Agriculture must receive adequate water to thrive and grow if we are to be sustainable.

Maui needs to pass strict conservation policies and penalize wasters with prohibitive rates. We need to conserve recycled water, gray water and use catchment. We need to find and repair all leaking pipes and flumes. We need to build more reservoirs, treatment facilities, and secure ownership of water sources for the benefit of our people.



Water response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

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Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

In a nut shell, we need to first indentify and understand Kuleana LCA awards. From that we will understand the importance as to why these lands were given its specific criteria during the time of the Mahele of 1850 and HRS 7-1, 1-1, which also identifies the Kanawai (Law) that defines an un-obtrustructive use. Incorporate that information into today’s policies and bring that management perspective back into our roles and responsibilities. Identify the system of government thru an Aha moku System where as the community becomes the watchful eyes of how our resources will and can be utilized and further more have a true understanding of the Hawaiian Geographical perspective were done and why. Example: every ridge, cliff, contour, hill, heat, wind and rain was given the name which can be found in our songs and chants that tell of why this place is so significant. Within the name we will find the answer.



Water response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

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Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We must get reliable data to help plan our future water systems. We lack data on the capacity of aquifers we are discussing in our future water development plans. This is not responsible planning.
I support water resource planning that takes a “whole systems” approach: viewing ground water, stream water, storm water and reclaimed wastewater as part of a continual cycle. I also support planning for the “worst possible weather scenario” and not over promising our water resources.

I support more public control and management of water resources on Maui, this includes acquiring land to install wells and spread out the pumping in Iao aquifer. I support the county claiming full use of the clean, high quality Iao tunnel water, instead of a portion going into the ditch system and to the sugar cane fields. I support restoration of stream flows in Na Wai Eha to help recharge the aquifer and prolong the life of existing county wells in the region.

I do not support backroom deals where the county gets only a portion of the water capacity of a new water source and the private landowner is guaranteed the other portion. I am concerned about the proposed proliferation of unverified private water systems such as those proposed for Wailea 670 and the Spencer development in Ma’alaea

I support local well backup systems in Haiku area to augment existing surface water systems and start getting folks off of the upcountry meter list. I support repairs to the Kula pipeline flumes to end waste of valuable water. I support tirelessly pursuing potential funding sources to allow more reclaimed water to be used for irrigation, agriculture, wetlands and fire suppression and end our dependence on injection wells and reduce demands for potable water in dry areas of central, south and West Maui.

I support the county modernizing its building codes to allow water efficiency devices such as gray water collection systems to irrigate yards and dual use installations that utilize collected shower water to flush toilets. I also intend to immerse myself in the study of which water pricing systems do the best to minimize wasteful use.



Water response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

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Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Water is the most pressing issue facing our community. In the Upcountry area, pushing to repair our leaky water transmission flumes and building additional reservoirs in Waikamoi is an important step that we must take. In addition, all throughout Maui County, developing new water sources will be top a priority of mine. No doubt these endeavors are costly. My solution however, calls for the development a long-term water plan that will outline how we will emerge as an island with adequate water resources to sustain our population. I envision this plan, which could follow a process similar to the development of the Maui Island Plan, will allow the County Council to more effectively budget monies and seek federal funding for projects.
Secondarily, we must also push for the conservation of water. A few ways to do this is by mandating all new construction projects having water saving fixtures. Our water fee structure must also be examined and users who consume more water than an average user with the same amount of people should get charged a higher rate for their ‘peak usage’. Most importantly, the County must also focus on finding cost effective ways of recycling greywater and wastewater for irrigation purposes through the budgeting and development of transmission lines.



Water response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

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Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

The one major tool for truly becoming a sustainable community is the Maui County Water Use and Development Codes which I am currently working on. This Water Use and Development code enforces the State Water Code which will allocate dollars towards the repair and maintenance of existing systems. Secondly, we must develop more storage of water and produce ground water resources to meet the needs future users. While this is an ongoing matter at the council, testimony is welcome from our citizens as this is needed if we are to make it a reality.



Water response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

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Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

The water problems are solvable thru catchments (reservoir) construction, current flume (Waikamole) repair and new transportation pumping and piping. This will require sources of funding. One possibility is that some percentage of property taxes for un-improved lands that are levied in water poor areas could be earmarked for water improvement systems. A second source could be that water for new developments that costs more than the current water costs could be levied at a higher rate. This is compensated for by the owners of the vacant land who will have a substantially higher value to their land when they get water and can use the land.



Water response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

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Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

An island wide system of wells that will not damage our aquifers. Restore stream flows except for taro and other appropriate agriculture uses.



Water response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

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Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I completely agree that water is essential and we can help address our water needs – while at the same time creating jobs – by developing water storage reservoirs and reclaimed water lines for irrigation.

One thing that I intend on proposing is an ordinance that would require owners of private wells- before dedicating the well to the County for maintenance – agree to giving the County at least 50 percent of the total available water (the past few water source agreements with private well owners either gave the County none of the water, or required only about 30 percent of the water go to the County while the owner took the rest.)

I also introduced a resolution entitled “Urging the Administration to Negotiate a Water Source Agreement with Piiholo South, LLC, relating to State Well No. 5118-04 to benefit the most applicants on the Upcountry Water Meter Priority List”. (It was claimed that this well could provide nearly 1.7 million gallons per day of potable water.) This resolution provided the following:
WHEREAS, there continues to be a severe shortage of potable water for Upcountry Maui residents; and
WHEREAS, there are over 1,300 applicants on the “Up country Water Meter Priority List” who have been waiting for water meters for many years; and
WHEREAS, long-time residents on the Upcountry Water Meter Priority List believe that it is unfair to allow developers to “jump ahead” or “cut in line” ahead of those on the Up country Water Meter List and sell water meters to those that can afford them; and
WHEREAS, Upcountry residents claim that the County of Maui has previously entered into water source development agreements with private well owners that allowed others to receive water meters before those on the Upcountry Water Meter List; and
WHEREAS, the County of Maui should be getting a larger percentage of the water from private well-owners, particularly when taxpayer dollars are being used to develop and transmit water from those sources; now, therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED by the Council of the County of Maui:
1. That it hereby affirms its willingness to work with the Upcountry community and the Administration toward the goal of providing water meters to the Upcountry residents who have been waiting years for water meters;
2. That it hereby urges the Administration to negotiate a Water Source Agreement relating to the well owned by Piiholo South, LLC, that would include a requirement that Piiholo South, LLC, dedicate a fully constructed, completed and outfitted groundwater well, specifically State Well No. 5118-04, to the Department of Water Supply whereby the County of Maui would receive 100 percent of the maximum water capacity in consideration for water allocation credits to Piiholo South, LLC; and
3. That it hereby urges the Administration to not submit any proposed project, application, or development that would use water from the Piiholo South Well, specifically State Well No. 5118-04, until the Council has had the time necessary to discuss and negotiate any use of this water with Piiholo South, LLC.”
Another thing that government can do to get, or “free up” potable water is to phase out the County’s use of injection wells and consider reusing the R-I reclaimed water for irrigation. Our County has a water shortage, yet our County is pumping approximately 11.7 million gallons per day of treated water into injection wells – much of which could be used for irrigation. At the same time, approximately 60 percent of the potable water in Kihei is used for outdoor irrigation. Accordingly, I believe that we should consider doing what it takes to make use of the reclaimed water for irrigation – thereby freeing up potable water.

In the last two years, some of the things that I did to pursue this approach for freeing up potable water are as follows:

1. I introduced language to the General Plan to “phase out the use of injection wells.”
2. During last year’s budget session, I introduced a proviso that required the Departments of Environmental Management to conduct a study on R -1 wastewater expansion and optimization in North Kihei. This proviso resulted in a study entitled “South Maui R-l Recycled Water Verification Study” (dated Dec. 2009) and includes a number of options for using the R-I water for irrigation in North Kihei. This study will help the Council set policy for the future.
3. During last year’s budget session, I also added a position to the department of Environmental Management to focus on reused water.
4. Then, during the most recent budget session, I added the following proviso that required the Department of Environmental Management, prior to expending funds, “to work with the Department of Water Supply and private entities on a new verification study that provides the Council with future alternatives for the transmission and optimization ofR-l recycled water from the Kahului Wastewater Reclamation Facility in order to provide a source of irrigation water for existing and planned future projects, and to provide alternatives to the use of injection wells.”

My justifications for this requirement included the following:
(a) Need for potable water due to the “Show me the Water” policy:
This Council set precedence for the rest of the State when it adopted the “Show me the Water” ordinance. With this policy in place, any development (including affordable homes) depends on showing proof of a long-term, reliable source of potable water. In essence, if there’s no available potable water, there’s no development. R-l water being injected into the ocean can be used for irrigation and thereby free up potable water.
(b) Need for Irrigation using R -1 Water
The Maui News (April 11) provided an article about how HC&S will be starting a multimillion dollar research project to potentially convert its sugar plantation into an energy farm with biofuel crops.
• HC&S stated that it had ”joined with U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye and received at least $4 million in annual federal funding for the research of new biofuels and energy conversion technologies.
• The US Dept of Energy; the US Navy; the US Dept of Agriculture and the University of Hawaii are all participating in this program. This means the potential for added federal monies.
• There is a prime opportunity to reuse a lot of the water now injected into the ocean and use it to irrigate the sugar cane, and then the biofuel crops. This is especially important given that HC&S may lose a percent of the stream water that now takes from East Maui streams.



Water response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

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Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

1. Sugar has only a limited life span here. Eventually the cost of production will exceed its value. Once sugar goes out, we need to have a plan for water use in place.
2. Look at desalinization. I realize now it is too expensive, but we should keep abreast of new technology.



Water response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

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Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

In light of the Na Wai Eha decision, which is still being appealed, it is clear that Maui relies far too much on surface water supplies. I will work in the Legislature to support efforts to drill wells to tap the subsurface water sources Maui needs in order to allow for stream restoration and water flow to taro farmers and other small farmers without the destruction of Maui’s largest farm–HC&S. A related concern is the continuing water supply problems facing agricultural and residential customers in Upcountry Maui.

The political narrative has been that more water equals more development, but on an acre by acre basis, residential users consume less water than cane plantations. So I firmly believe that if HC&S shuts down due to lack of water, the result will be a massive multi-decade wave of development in central Maui.



Water response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

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Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Maui County has had a persistent problem with infrastructure meeting the demands of growth and has relied on exactions on new developers to install or pay for better facilities. Water infrastructure is one major component which limits efficient and equitable use of available sources. With water disputes and conflicts in both East and West Maui and the high costs of developing additional wells (and the pumping costs of using those wells) and water treatment facilities, State assistance (or authorization for the County to create new revenue sources through special assessments or temporary tax levies) for developing, constructing and maintaining water and wastewater infrastructure is needed. I introduced a bill (HB 1576) which allows the Counties to levy additional general excise taxes (just as Honolulu did to support its rail project) for water and wastewater infrastructure, including reclaimed water pipelines and facilities.

On the Ewa plains of Oahu, the City and County of Honolulu Department of Water Supply took on the reuse program that in Maui County remains the kuleana of the wastewater division of the Department of Environmental Management (DEM). The Oahu water managers saw the connection between reducing demand for potable water by providing reclaimed wastewater for certain irrigation and agricultural uses. Maui County continues to use injection wells to dispose of treated wastewater. While there is some reuse from the Kihei Waterwater Reclamation Facility by neighboring golf courses and from the Kahului and Lahaina facilities for construction dust control and some limited irrigation, additional infrastructure is needed for higher treatment and to reduce the millions of gallons in effluent injected. Water tanks and pipelines (and pumps since the existing facilities often are downhill of where the treated water could be reused) need to be built. DEM uses $1million per mile as a working estimated cost for reuse infrastructure.

Reuse will allow Maui to reduce the amount of surface and well water now used for landscape and certain kinds of agricultural irrigation. In addition, in order to facilitate agriculture and allow additional stream restoration, some investment should be placed constructing more reservoirs and making existing open ditch systems more efficient to reduce losses from leaks and evaporation (upcountry agricultural and central Maui farmers largely depend on agricultural water from the old plantation ditch and reservoir systems which are largely unlined).

Whether water will be made available from plantation ditches for agricultural uses (large scale or small, agriculture other than perhaps traditional kalo cultivation, have not been found to be Public Trust use entitled to priority for diverted water use) will depend on decisions by the Commission on Water Resource Management and the court opinions which likely will follow.

Finally, the County needs to base water use and source decisions on geographic reality rather than paper legalities—to look at ahupua’a (or entire watersheds) management concepts. My understanding is that well water (potable and brackish) in the hillsides above South Maui might be available for potable and landscape irrigation uses in arid Kihei and Wailea. Potable water from Central Maui sources are currently piped (using energy) to South Maui. A barrier to water use from the hillsides has been provisions in the county community plans which limit water sources for use only in the same community plan district. Portions of the ahupuaa along the South Maui shoreline are split between the Upcountry and South Maui community plan districts.



Water response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

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Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Demands have been ongoing on Maui from the families upcountry seeking to build on their aina to the huge developers. Water meters are not available for them, especially in certain areas. There are solutions and it takes money and creative minds to figure out how. Water desalination, wells and other alternatives are known so let’s look at how we can cut the costs by again, working together and partnering. As a business owner, I understand and accept changes to policies, etc. to improve and survive a business and will apply these experiences and leadership skills to assisting at the legislature.



Water response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

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Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I have focused on water availability and water quality since being elected. Dry conditions have always been a concern to Upcountry Maui residents and are especially important to our farmers whose crops and profits suffer during extra dry years. In 2008, I was able to secure $3,750,000 in state capital improvement funds – an amount that needs to be met by Maui County –to begin the joint county-state-federal project of planning and designing a water reservoir for Upcountry Maui. Federal funds are expected to pay for half of the $15 million. Storage capacity is the long term solution.

While the County provides water to our residents, state and federal governments establish water quality standards. All three branches work together to promote greater conservation efforts. I am particularly concerned about the amount of water required to put out brush fires during times of drought.



Water response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

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Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I will either re-introduce or support the grey water bill. I will support tax incentives and bond issues for water reclamation.



Water response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

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Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life.
To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility.

At the school level, students need to develop a better understanding of the water cycle, particularly as it relates to living on an island. They need to be educated about water consumption and the need to use this resource more wisely. At the school level, we need to have catchment systems to collect water expelled by the air conditioning units. Schools should also stop using large area sprinklers to the point of flooding the yard, and use drip irrigation and/or utilize xeroscapy for the landscaping.



Water response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

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Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

Building a well at each school is an investment that can reduce cost over time. Currently schools are using water for ground that is not for drinking. On the roof of each building, water can be collected and stored.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

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Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We will work to create common sense rules to allow and help small businesses and home based businesses to develop in a reasonable manner in our communities. We will provide County personnel to help projects get proper permits in a timely manner. We would not be shutting down so many who are trying to help themselves as is occurring with the current administration.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

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Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Develop more agricultural parks; (b) Develop water sources for domestic and diversified agricultural uses; (c) Work with sustainability organizations and others to identify sites for community gardens; (d) With assistance from an Agricultural Advisory Committee to the Office of Economic Development, review issues and needs to sustain agriculture, including priorities for marketing and promotion; land use policy issues; shipping and transportation problems; and other related matters.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

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Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We are all in this together and we must all come up with solutions for this together. I believe that we will always be changing Islands and that we need to make policies to protect both our businesses and our neighborhoods. These policies must be flexible and must provide protection to our businesses and our people. We are one in the same. I believe there are many occupations that are designed for home businesses and there are some that should not be allowed. Now we need to develop areas where this is part of the designs and we also can allow some in our current neighbor hoods. Together we must decide.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

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Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I will encourage small, local and home-based businesses by updating zoning codes written 50 years ago with ones written for the 21st century. In this age of computers and the internet we want these businesses to facilitate raising children and improve our individual’s and families’ quality of life.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

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Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would promote small business by introducing policies that reduce the increasingly popular idea of large big box stores. Our “mom and pop’ stores are what make Hawaii what it is (was) I would support our small businesses by working with the planning department and zoning laws to help new and existing small businesses get off and running and sustain themselves through programs and workshops sponsored by the county. I would support and implement a program of “ house keeping” finding and purchasing abandoned homes and building to be leased or sold to small businesses for use instead of building more. Make use of what we have before planning for more.



Local Economy response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

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Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Small business is crucial in maintaining a viable and vibrant economic engine. Diversifying our economic base from a service/tourism economy is necessary. The unintended and uncontrollable economic swings of our tourist economy can be softened if we make a conscientious effort to create other economies. Food security is a viable and necessary economic engine. Support diverse agricultural activities and encourage the growing of nutritious foods that will feed our people is an economic opportunity. When we spend approximately $6 billion dollars annually to support farmers elsewhere in the world to feed us, surely, redirecting those dollars within our islands is logical, prudent and necessary.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Don Couch

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Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

One of the reasons I am running for County office is because I sincerely believe that we need to get government out of the way of small business. We have way too many laws and rules that keep ordinary folks from being able to earn a living. I was appalled at what happened to Hanzawa Store: a nearly 100-year old business, essential to and much loved by its rural community, is blocked from getting commercial zoning because of mean spirited opposition that had nothing to do with the store. That’s just wrong. I have been amazed by the short-sightedness of the county when it came to home-based businesses – including vacation rentals, ocean activities, Halloween, and even something as fundamental as simple signs in a business window. The attitude is wrong. Instead of always finding a way to get in the way, the County needs to limit its involvement with business for when there are true questions of public health or safety involved.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

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Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would support small, local and home-based businesses
by utilizing federal programs. On June 29, 2010, the Federal Small Business Jobs Act, was enacted to help small businesses access capital, stimulate investment in small businesses and promote entrepreneurship – all of which will help small business create local jobs. Congress established a Small Business Lending Fund [SBLF] of $30 billion to provide capital investments to small community banks to increase small business lending.

Maui Economic opportunity [MEO] Work Force Development, and the Hawaii Small Business Development Center, among other Maui County agencies and businesses can access this money for business development. With the economy improving, and more tourists visiting the islands, starting a business and improving an existing business can be funded through the SBLF.

I have been a small business owner since I arrived on Maui in 1975. I speak from experience, home-based businesses are sustainable, profitable and add value to the community.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

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Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a small business owner myself, taxes are a huge chunk out of our take. I would look at how adjustments could be made to our taxes. I would be encouraging of zoning changes where businesses are below and residences above, revisit TVR’s & B&B’s with conditions like no negative impacts to surrounding neighbors and they cannot take away from our affordable rental/housing pool, home based businesses must be encouraged as long there are no negative impacts to neighboring surroundings.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

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Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Home based business has been a favorite subject for me. I would like to see a good home business law passed asap that would be positive and encourage home occupations, but have strong rules about businesses that should not be in neighborhoods because they would cause problems for others. I got the B&B law passed and would like to see a TVR law passed, too. I think working at home is great-takes cars off our streets, allows caregiving while working, and gives our people a chance to earn $$ in their own homes. Many of our mega businesses began at home. It’s American to let people earn a living using their ingenuity and hard work in their homes.

As I did the B&Bs, I would like to get the TVR and home based business laws passed. It will depend who chairs the Planning Committee next term whether or not this will be done. I am a supporter of home occupations.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

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Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I have sat on the County Cultural Resources Commission and we are required to review historic architecture, sign ordinances and guidelines. The biggest concerns that we cannot but always try to, is to address the big guy versus the smaller guy syndrome. We need to look at the integrity of that establishment on why it’s unique, understand what is the district requirement based upon land use and historic criteria and allow those uses. Example: Lahaina is very unique in many ways and very competitive; by using the local populous to create events that are community driven would create cohesiveness within the general populous, supported by the businesses, like the International Festival of Canoes. There were opportunities for cultural exchanges, education of the distinct art form by utilizing invasive materials, stimulus of the economics with the business communities that would sponsor in return Promote their affiliation and acquire the finished product, and allow for the true sense of how a village would pull together during economic hardship.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

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Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As a small business owner, this is a personal cause for me. We must review the ordinances that stifle this emerging sector of our economy and reform those policies that do not serve today’s needs. A home occupation bill needs to be completed and it should address home businesses on urban, rural and ag land. We also need to have the regulations that govern our traditional small business districts make sense, and have enough flexibility to not be a burden. Current practices are not promoting efficient processing of needed permits for business start-ups. Businesses are forced to wait months for certificate of occupancy, informed of needed requirements in a piecemeal fashion, and generally not given sufficient support. Some communities so value their small businesses that they offer micro-loan programs, grants and technical assistance to help keep businesses viable. Maui County has a small-town planning specialist. This position should have its duties expanded to include troubleshooting the problems small businesses face.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

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Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I am big supporter of entrepreneurs and the right to operate a business from your own home. Like any other entity or business however, there are specific laws that must be followed. Unfortunately, County administrations have been sporadic in consistent regulation and ultimately unfair to small business owners. If elected I will never make or support decisions that will adversely hurt our business community, like the recent rash of home-based business citations. There are more collaborate ways of identifying amicable solutions that are agreeable by all parties and won’t hurt a person’s financial well-being. Ultimately, I feel there is no harm in allowing home-based businesses to operate in residential neighborhoods, as long as they do not disrupt the character and peace of the surrounding community. It must however, be a community decision and the process must be fair to all parties involved. I believe the current approval process is overly bureaucratic and I will work to streamline procedures so a final decision can be rendered in a matter of weeks and not months or years.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

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Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would encourage collaborative partnerships with the State and Federal government as well as the business community to provide start up loans, grants for home based and sustainable businesses.I would urge the policy makers within the particular departments at the County level to streamline the permitting process and to make doing business with the County of Maui a pleasant and productive experience. I would look for ways to try innovative businesses approaches with DBEDT and the Office of Economic Development to broaden the allowable types of home based businesses which can be operated without causing disruption to neighborhoods.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

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Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would work to create and implement a well crafted Home Occupation Bill ASAP. I feel that the sooner we can get this accomplished, the better. It is a key component in our economic revitalization plan. While no one wants obnoxious smells, loud noises nor unreasonable disturbances in their neighborhoods, there are many businesses that can be done in the home that will truly help the people, including single mothers, their children, people who care for the elderly and the elderly that are being cared for. Homes and families can be saved from the destruction caused by a lack of income. For example; we have many industries that are computer driven. Different areas have different needs and some business that might not be acceptable in a close built neighborhood might be just fine in a rural setting. Accordingly, if the business is not a nuisance to its neighbors it should be allowed in the home. People should NEVER be unreasonably prohibited from working to take care of their families and homes.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

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Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

By making the permitting process for home business fast and fair.



Local Economy response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

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Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Government should support farmers, and other small businesses – including bed & breakfasts and other short-term rentals (so long as the surrounding neighbors and those immediately impacted are notified and allowed to share concerns.)

I also believe that our small businesses benefit greatly from our visitors. As our economy is largely tourism-based, the environment is our economy. Therefore, it’s vital that we protect our environment so that our visitor industry – which directly affects our residents’ health, welfare, and job security – can remain healthy. We must also make decisions today to ensure that Maui County will not look like another Waikiki in the future – but remains the special place that our residents enjoy and visitors flock to.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

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Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I support laws that are more business friendly than the current ruling part. I will do what I can to cut taxes and spending so that business in Hawaii can thrive.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

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Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As co-founder of Maui Gateway internet service provider, I know the unfair tax and regulatory burden business carries. We need to diversify our economy to reduce dependence on tourism and land development. I will oppose new taxes, and will work to eliminate inefficient and wasteful State spending. I will seek to use urban State lands to develop small business parks in order to reduce the excessive cost of business-zoned facilities and increase opportunities for small, locally owned businesses.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

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Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As I neighbor island legislator, I have to remain mindful that our county’s economy has a different make up and scale from Oahu, and the effect of tax changes may have different impacts on Maui, Lanai and Molokai. I am interested in exploring ways to help existing businesses thrive rather than creating new tax credits that benefit only large financial institutions, insurance companies and investors searching for a tax shelter. At the same time, I did not support changing the rules of the game (such as ending the availability of tax credits early, or deferring the claiming of earned tax credits) because small businesses need to be able to rely on the assumptions of their investment.

I co-sponsored HB 2169 [Act 2 (2010)] to protect our small businesses from a 1000% increase in unemployment taxes, automatically triggered by the high number of people who recently lost their jobs and are collecting unemployment. The automatic increase in payments was to maintain the solvency of the Unemployment fund. Unfortunately, the increase was so large that most businesses would be hard pressed to cover that cost. Act 2 reduces the automatic ten-fold increase in unemployment taxes for small businesses, and allows the fund to be replenished over time.

Another important bill that would impact our small businesses was SB 1641 where the Lingle administration and legislative leaders proposed an “accounting trick” to generate more revenue for the state by cashing in on a one-time take of tax dollars from small business tax filings. The idea was to move the General Excise Tax filing date up from the end of the month, to the 20th day of that month. While this will put money in the state’s coffers earlier, the change would also leave many small businesses scrambling to find the cash to pay their taxes on time. Smaller companies are less likely to keep excess revenue lying around, and the potential trouble that would occur did not seem worth the one-time revenue gain for the state. I ended up being one of only fifteen representatives to oppose this bill.

I also supported basic public works initiatives in the State budget which will be built by local companies and local trades. I want to work with County officials (both the Councilmembers and Administration) to identify areas where State laws need changes for local businesses to survive. For example, the legislature considered the appropriateness of locating alternative energy facilities from wind and solar on agricultural lands beyond support for agricultural activities on that land.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

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Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I am a small business owner and a former planning commissioner and I understand the need to support them. Complaints from neighbors and infringement upon their residential living conditions when infracted upon are the detriments to closing home-based businesses. There are rules and regulations for home-based businesses and we need to comply, however, there are so many options to have one in your home. Small businesses are the heart of America and I will continue to support and seek solutions to any problematic concern.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

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Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I believe that small, local and home-based businesses may benefit greatly by faster broadband capability for web-based activity. I’ve introduced Broadband legislation and worked with the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs to establish a specific program and coordinator for broadband development. Teleworks is a part of this legislation, which encourages working from home using broadband technology.

I also think that small businesses need to compete on a level playing field and that we need a better review of the state’s regulations that impact small business in order to get rid of certain regulations that may no longer be needed.



Local Economy response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

Issue: Local Economy    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

When I worked for Representative Rida Cabanilla in 2009 I wrote a home business bill, which she introduced. It went all the way through the house, but died in the Senate Transportation Committee. I will re-introduce the bill when in office. If invited, I will join the Small Business Caucus, working to remove over-regulation and unwieldy burdens on small business.



Local Economy response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

Issue: Local Economy    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life. To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move
from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility.

The idea of entrepreneurship needs to be expanded in the schools. Children (and their parents) need to be made aware of the local economic model, and how buying local not only supports Hawaii businesses, it supports a more responsible use of resources. (Why ship strawberries from California when you can buy them from Kula?) Keeping money in the community helps all of Maui.



Local Economy response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

Issue: Local Economy    Question Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

The school can function as a market for local businesses. Providing classes and incubator classes will help students and possibly adults to learn the principles and skills to create and successfully operate a small business.



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate
Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We need to change our system of Waste Management. I was part of a company that proposed converting our landfills to an aerobic system. We would first remove all of the desired recyclable materials from the landfill, then treat the balance in a natural, “no chemical added” system that would allow our community to treat and reuse our landfill spaces. Our Company proposed to do a pilot project for free, but we were told that the County would have to develop an RFP and that it would take years to complete. We recognized the stall but we are still waiting for the RFP to be completed.

The effluent from our wastewater treatment process needs to be recycled and reused. I have a plan on how to accomplish this with the least amount of expense in the Kahului area.



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Chris Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Expand curbside recycling and green waste pickup; (b) Improve capabilities for sorting of trash to recycle



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We need to make it easier to do and more viable for people to recycle, reduce and reclaim items. The easier we make it and the better our people are told of the benefits, the more they will be willing to assist. We need to be visionaries, to make sure that we are not creating more problems from our green movement. (Example Mercury and Lead) We can find optimal plans and we are smart enough to make them economically viable for the people of Maui. The incentives are a better life and a better place and safer place to live for the people of the County of Maui. We will coordinate with the manufacturers on ways to reduce and or recycle. We can always look at penalties and enforcement later if parties do not seem to be interested in our goals.



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I favor letting private companies collect and dispose of our waste as the county provides guidelines to ensure that it is done in an environmentally conscious way. Private companies find more efficient ways to organize people and accomplish the task at hand.



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would implement a curbside recycle program as well as a pay as you dump program that promotes recycling by charging customers a fee “per can” to dump trash at the landfill. I would introduce a waste to energy program to educate the community of the possibility of using out opala to produce energy. I would also enforce strong penalties on those that import, use, and dump and hazardous waste in Maui county. I would also implement policies regarding the hazardous waste run off of large ag companies that spray hazardous materials into our land that eventually run off and cause problems in our ocean and on the reefs.



Waste Management response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Waste to energy is a viable option for us to implement. Source separation will allow us to look at solid waste as a resource. Recycling of sourced materials for reuses become a possible economic opportunity while other materials are used for power generation and reduced landfills. Methane collection from current landfills need to be utilized for alternative energy production and use. These systems currently exist and we need to implement is use. Green waste need to be utilized for composting and soil conditioning.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Don Couch

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Don Couch    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

No answer.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Eve Clute    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

When I was on the Mayor’s Committee on Solid Waste [2008-09] I voted to increase recycling operations with the 3 bin system for curb-side pick-up. Bin [1] for household garbage; Bin [2] for green waste for composting; and Bin [3] for recyclables. With limited recycling on Maui, the placement of the 3-bin system would separate trash and assist in keeping reusable and toxic materials out of the landfill.

An example of toxic recyclables include batteries and electronic components, that can leach toxic lead, mercury, cadmium and other elemental metals into the environment when the casing is broken. By having more battery and electronics recycling programs in place, known toxics can be taken out of the waste stream. [See <http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/hwtr/demodebris/pages2/demobatteries.html&gt; for info on batteries and <http://www.computerhope.com/disposal.htm&gt; for electronic components.]

Longs Drug stores in Hawaii no longer have a battery recycling program. When the Hawaii chain of Long’s stores was bought out by CVS in 2009, CVS did not have a battery recycling program available. I called the CVS corporate offices in Rhode Island and was told that they are in the process of setting up a battery recycling program for Hawaii. I am talking with CVS to set up a battery recycling program for all Long’s stores statewide. I will keep you posted as to the outcome.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Elle Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Curbside recycling is a must. A version of Oahu’s H-Power trash to energy would work here. I will look into ways to turn our plastics into reusable products. Buy Maui First campaign must be kept alive. Slow the importing of outside products to our islands so we are encouraged to make and use our own products.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Handling waste management for Maui county is outlined in the recently completed Solid Waste Management Plan. Although the plan is a good one, clearly defining a need to invest in a materials recycling facility and other technology to reduce the waste going to our landfills, we lack the will to pay a little more or to perform the tasks required to recycle to protect our environment. We need to look into using waste to energy technology, too. Each proposal our solid waste folks submit to institute curbside recycling meets with resistance due to increased cost. Small increases of $2 per month for trash collection are hotly debated and have been defeated. We passed the plastic bag bill which is a small step towards reducing litter. Much more needs to be done. I would like to see tough enforcement of litter laws. Litter is a pet peeve of mine.

We need to make recycling easy to do, build our materials recovery facility, and go to waste to energy. This will take a huge amount of funding and unless we are ready to pay more, will require many years to build and operate



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

It is good to see that our recycle center are busy with can and bottle collectors that make a profit to help sustain themselves which provides side cash for the much needed things within every household.

If there were way of how we could use that same incentive to spark an interest within every home then we would be able to address those problems. In the commercial industries, we need to make it a requirement that whatever is sold here in Hawaii, that the seller of those products be required to purchase back the used or broken product at a cost; example: the biggest products sold and is very hazardous, are batteries. Napa would buy back your used battery for $5.00 off on a new purchase battery. Those batteries if good can be turned around recycled and sold again at a very inexpensive cost. Parts from auto companies have another option that if you have a broken part, they would ask, with the consumer be interested in purchasing a rebuilt part, in turn they would ask for the old part in exchange for the rebuilt one at a way more inexpensive price then purchasing a brand-new part. The same goes for derelict cars. People are always looking for parts, instead of ordering from the mainland and waiting for the product which may be the expensive and time consuming would help alleviate those problems. The general populous needs to know that there are concerns, options and solutions.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

We need to reduce waste as much as possible. The time has come to have a Material Recovery facility to separate out all useable materials from the waste stream and reduce our overall waste volume to a small percentage of what it is today. This is one strategy recommended in our Solid Waste Plan. We also need to have more incentive programs to encourage the recycling and proper disposal of hazardous items such as car batteries, vehicles and appliances. I am uncertain whether a trash to energy facility is the right path for Maui, I have concerns about disposal of the ash that is produced. I would support the establishment of local green waste composting centers to minimize driving.

Long term, I would like to see a reduction in excess packaging, through appropriate ordinance and a “cradle-to-grave” responsibility for products that are not easily recyclable.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Mary Cochran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

One of the most important programs that I hope to see implemented in the near future is curbside recycling. Although there is a high cost barrier, I believe it is the first step in getting Maui County residents serious about recycling and will help to ultimately reduce our trash. I will work hard on the Council and with County Departments to get this budgeted and implemented.

The County must also take a look at preserving our Central Maui landfill, as it will be a costly and time consuming process to search for a new site. I would like to see our current landfill’s life prolonged through recycling efforts and by phasing in the use of H-Power, which will burn our trash and emit renewable energy. This too, has a major cost, but we must get serious about our trash management and there is no reason why Maui County can’t be saving and budgeting for this proven technology. We cannot afford to fall into the same trash management situation as Oahu.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Michael Victorino    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

I would to look at policies to eliminate all identified hazardous materials that go into our landfills. We need to have clearly defined guidelines, rules, and also penalties and fines for abusers of these policies. At the same time, we need to look for alternative, affordable environmentally friendly replacements, not to disrupt businesses but to guide them towards a green lifestyle that we desire for Maui County. I strongly support the elimination of injection wells and the development of treated water for landscaping and ag uses. Water is the pivotal resources that Maui County’s future relies upon and I will continue to advocate and work towards the fair usage of this precious commodity.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Paul Laub    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

A recycling and resell store with an onsite separation system should be established here where the good items, of which there are many that currently go to the landfill are sold and /or given to prospective users. Typically paints and chemicals are given and all other items sold. Mulch can be produced and sold in bulk. This is a system that is utilized in numerous communities in other states and one of which is in Monterey County California operates the “Last Chance Mercantile”. They make a profit which goes to Landfill projects and specifically to hazardous waste removal and disposition. This system handles all the bulk recycle such as cardboard and paper and metals. Also, implementation of the H-power method will reduce landfill by 90% while generating 7% of Maui’s electricity needs.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Robert Carroll    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Full recycling of everything that can be recycled. Higher tipping fees for those who do not participate.



Waste Management response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

As I see it, recycling is important for the future of our communities and more should be done. One thing that I intend to do is ask the Council and administration to take a look at curbside and other recycling efforts.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

1.Maui needs to be more serious on recycling. My neighborhood picks up green waste once a week. I think the county should, too.
2.Recycle bins similar to Oahu.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:George Fontaine    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Because so many shipping containers leave Hawaii empty, we have an opportunity to export steel, aluminum, e-waste, and other recyclables–other than garbage– to mainland or Asian buyers. I will work to prevent situations such as Maui’s recent period without an auto recycling facility. I will support efforts to promptly deliver junk vehicles to auto recyclers for dismantling and reuse.

Honolulu’s recent waste export debacle shows that exporting bulk refuse to the mainland is a non-starter. The H-Power model provides us with a successful example to build a system where refuse is recycled into energy, thus reducing landfill usage and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels. Recycled glass and the ash product from H-Power can be mixed into asphalt and concrete paving products, which further reduces quarrying, pollution, landfill use, fossil fuel consumption, and imports.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Diversion is a key to cutting down on the need for more dumps. Recycling, reusing or biological treatment of solid waste should be supported. The statewide landfill diversion rate is 31.4% with Maui at 30%. The costs of developing additional phases of the Central Maui Landfill, to comply with EPA and DOH design requirements, are large and are not self-supporting from current tipping fees (which then requires a large subsidy from County general funds—usually property tax revenues– or available State or Federal grants).

DEM has been considering a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) for over a decade. As the County completes implementation of automated collection where it can, the County needs to consider whether to move towards universal collection (where collection services are provided by the County or its contractor for all property owners which should limit the incentive to avoid dumping fees by using gulches and isolated parcels as unpermitted landfills) so that it can control the flow and disposal of accumulated waste material.

The little change in the law approved this year (Act 12 [HB 2427] (makes solid waste plans more useful by changing the interval between revisions of county solid waste management plans from 5 to 10 years) will allow DEM to put more energy and resources into implement its plans. For example, landfill gas operators have been waiting for a change to bid on developing a system using the methane on the closed portions of the existing Central Maui Landfill while other trash to energy operators have been waiting for an opportunity to use their small facility technology to convert to energy the relatively smaller amount of trash generated on Maui.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

This is a very important topic and Maui has companies who fulfill the need to protect, remove, and dispense of hazardous waste. Education awareness of the dangers of these wastes should be publicized in our media, schools and where the majority will see it. It is crucial to the safety of our communities and its people. Separation and storing guidelines for safety should be a policy enforced to companies and individuals who have a connection to using and dispensing hazardous waste and penalties extreme to protect the people in our communities.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

Waste management is a county function. I think every county needs to step up on recycling efforts, and to work with businesses to transition into using eco-friendly bags and containers. I would like to see our state and county offices explore new and emerging technology in waste management designed to reduce waste going into the landfill.

Long term, the state should encourage re-manufacturing of our waste and local facilities that process recyclable waste. The UH School of Engineering is a critical component to the solution. Research and pilot projects are possible with their resources.



Waste Management response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Netra Halperin    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

My understanding is that the proposed site for the waste recycling facility is on land owned by the State. If possible, I will work with the new governor to release the land for use in this important project.



Waste Management response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

Issue: Waste Management    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Barry Wurst    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life.
To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility

The state of Hawaii needs to seriously consider incinerating our seemingly endless supply of garbage to generate Hpower. This would greatly decrease our expanding landfills and the need to ship our garbage to the Mainland, and it will provide clean, safe power for our schools and community. We should also promote home composting to support, maintain and help “Victory Gardens” to flourish.



Waste Management response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

Issue: Waste Management    Question Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

Waste disposal is a cost item for schools. Schools can recycle and reprocess waste. This also serves as a model for the community. If this program is tied to vocational education, agriculture, and science, the recycling and reprocessing of waste can be done for the community. It will be necessary to show the BOE that health issues are being dealt with.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Alan Arakawa

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate
Candidate:Alan Arakawa    Previous Issue Summary Table

I will reopen the doors of the Mayor’s office on the 9th floor of the County Building. Our staff will return phone calls. As we did in the past, we will again schedule meetings with anyone who wants to meet with us.

I will not make promises that I have no intent of fulfilling (such as occurred with the Vacation Rental Group that was promised amnesty by the Current Administration if they helped to create County laws for the industry.) I will follow through on my commitments unlike the Tavares Administration which promised to condemn the Wailuku Water Company’s assets and then did not follow through.

After declaring that the construction of a hundred million gallons reservoir Upcountry was their top priority and after securing Federal and State funds to design it, they were too complacent to even start the process. Millions of dollars have lapsed due to this inaction.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Chris Hart

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Chris Hart    Previous Issue Summary Table

(a) Insure that public hearings are held on major County policy changes; (b) Meet after working hours with citizens to review and discuss community concerns and issues; (c) Respond to citizen inquiries in a timely manner.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Jonathon Olson

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Jonathon Olson    Previous Issue Summary Table

I will listen and I will be available and I will do.

I am here to help everyone, but we must all care and not just look out for ourselves, as we are all in this together.

I Care, I am a Problem Solver and I am a Leader!

I am not taking campaign donations, so no one expects me to favor their ideas. I am for ideas from all parties that benefit the Islands of the County of Maui, the People and Businesses of Maui and the Tourists and Investors that support the County of Maui. I respect all and listen to all and will provide answers to all and explain to them why they may not always get what they think is best. By setting a standard and being consistent and setting examples for the awesome employees of the County of Maui, we will accomplish this together. We must save the Aloha, before it is to late.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Ori Kopelman

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ori Kopelman    Previous Issue Summary Table

As members of Mauitopia or the first ideal society of over 100,000 people in the world we’d all realize that we’re not only interdependent on each other but all need each other to survive and thrive. I love our sunshine laws and would keep promoting trust, openness and respect as those have been shown to be the best way to organize people to work together. Furthermore sticking to reasonable timelines, for example in issuing building permits and water meters, will give our citizens the feeling that the county is not working against them but with them.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Sally Chow Hammond

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sally Chow Hammond    Previous Issue Summary Table

I would hold a monthly “State of the County” broadcast on Akaku talking about the ‘goings on ‘ in the county for the month as well as answer any questions that citizens may have. I would open a web page/facebook where citizens feel comfortable to ask questions without fear of “county websites’ or lack of knowledge of how to navigate the county site. I would from the very beginning make it known, as I already have, that I am one of you. We are all citzens of Maui county, I of Moloka’i and we together, and only together will lead Maui down the path of sustainability. No government can do it without its citizens.

I would take trips to the schools, personally, to talk to the youth of Moloka’i, Lana’i and Maui to get their ideas of what their aina should be and their ideas on how to get to the place that we all want, the place of sustainability and food security. I would make it clear that I, as your mayor work for you, the people of Maui nui. I would by example show that we can not continue to dream about taking our county to that place. We can not hope for the change we need. I will lead the way for all of us to BE the change we need to get Maui County to that level of safety and sustainability that we once were.



Support of Citizens response by Mayoral candidate Sol Kaho`ohalahala

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Sol Kaho`ohalahala    Previous Issue Summary Table

I support collaboration and partnerships that lead to the betterment and improvement of our conditions. Trust, openness and respect are vital components to achieve mutual success. Government needs to become a friend of the people it seeks to serve. Rather than being adverse to our people through policies, rules and regulations, we should strive to find ways that will promote collaboration. Seeking efficiencies through our government employees is good for all of us. Encouraging their input and ideas for problem solving is to build an organizational partnership that can only benefit our communities.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Don Couch

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Don Couch    Previous Issue Summary Table

For starters, we need to shift the Council’s elective process from the current at-large system, to districts. Our voters do not understand our current system. Incumbents are frequently returned to districts who do not want them, because the current system gives total advantage to incumbents, and especially those from Lanai and Molokai. Voters understand the idea of electing a single person who will represent their interests in the halls of government. What we have now structurally is only a borderline democracy.

As a Council Member, I will be out in the local community, interacting with and helping residents to the degree a Council Member can. My door will be open and I will attempt to seriously hear all sides of the story before I make up my mind. That certainly did not happen in the Hanzawa’s case. Increasingly, Maui County has been walling itself off from the community it serves. That’s wrong. The doors have to be open – e komo mai – and the representative has to be out in the community that elected him. The current member from South Maui does not meet with the community and does not attend local events. That’s the opposite of the way I want to serve.

When I worked as an Executive Assistant to the Mayor, my job was to be a liaison to South and West Maui. When I said “hi, I’m from the County and I am here to help” I meant it. And more often than not, I was able to help. I focused on that and I have continued to serve South Maui as a board member of the Kihei Community Association. I find that type of work to be quite rewarding. That’s one of the reasons I am running for the South Maui seat on the County Council.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Eve Clute

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Eve Clute    Previous Issue Summary Table

I am a strong proponent of the Sunshine law and other policies County Council policies that promote open government. I will be accountable, transparent and promote communication between our government and the people of Maui.

Maui County, Hawaii Free Public Records Directory can be found at < http://publicrecords.onlinesearches.com/HI_Maui.htm > This County website allows for free online searches for many records, including Maui County property tax and assessment records, Maui County codes, ordinances, the charter resolutions and environmental programs.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Elle Cochran

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Elle Cochran    Previous Issue Summary Table

Having been born and raised here the actions of Aloha, Malama, Laulima and Ohana are inherent in my being which will guide relationship building on the council.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Gladys Baisa

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gladys Baisa    Previous Issue Summary Table

I believe my record shows that I welcome public input. I honestly have an open door policy in my office and meet with dozens of people each month on both sides of issues and listen to many ideas,try to resolve complaints, and take other input. I like to attend and also have community groups provide input to the Council through their own group meetings. It gives us direction when groups meet, openly discuss and relay their results. I would like to see occasional evening Council meetings to allow the working public more opportunities to attend. Democracy is an open process and everyone should have the opportunity to participate. The best part of my job is meeting many different people and getting to know them. We may not agree, but I still like to listen to all sides of issues.

I think a lot more community meetings with issues brought to the communities for discussion is necessary. I would like to see some of the Council meetings in the evening when people who work can attend and participate. The lack of two way communication affects our ability to get input, new ideas, and share our thoughts and facts about the issues that are important to our community. I spend a lot of time meeting with almost every person who asks to meet with me, listening to their feelings and ideas. I also try to return all calls, and if I cannot, make sure my staff does. This is how you build trust and respect.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Ke’eaumoku Kapu

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ke’eaumoku Kapu    Previous Issue Summary Table

Hawaii out of all the many places is very unique in many ways we have from earnest through culture, Language and custom within our come unities, the state of Hawaii have officially recognized the language as the first Language in Hawaii but not fully supported throughout.

In every culture we find discussion of any topic conflicting based upon our eagerness to participate, we need to instill an island perspective through protocol which is only considered during special events with the Maui County Council. I can instill those perspectives which in turn would create an eagerness to understand the complications we face together, to demonstrate our resolve through unity, clarity of purpose in serving the interests of our people, and our cultural/traditional/linguistic and spiritual integrity. I would call upon our leaders and all our people to join hands so that we journey toward our destiny, Proud, Happy and United. To understand my role as a servant for the people, of the people and by the people, that is all that matters.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Kai Nishiki

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Kai Nishiki    Previous Issue Summary Table

Transition to some system of District voting could lessen the influence of voter block politics. More information should be available on proposed developments. I would support a sign being placed on development sites with a description of what is proposed and when hearing dates are. Formation of regional advisory groups could help keep citizens aware of plans for local developments and facilities and offer an alternative to the long drive into Wailuku for those who want to offer comments. Council member’s voting records on ordinances should be readily available in an online database to ensure accountability.

The Council should have checks and balances to determine if County Departments are successfully complying with our laws as they make decisions about new projects. Currently this is not always the case, which prompts citizen distrust.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Mary Cochran

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Mary Cochran    Previous Issue Summary Table

I am a firm believer in working together to develop solutions that will positively impact our future. Serving for eight years on the Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) taught me that decisions are never made unilaterally and there must be agreement and support to get anything done. I have always worked with Aloha and care deeply about all opinions. You will know where I stand on issues and I will strive to give you no non-sense answers. With my background as a lawyer, I enjoy hearing different sides of an issue and always work to understand the context and reason for a person’s opinion. As I have in the past, I will continue to welcome individuals at anytime, any place to talk about any issue. If elected, I will also have an open door policy, and will encourage you to visit.

Most importantly, just as I have with the Board of Education, I will continue to hold quarterly meetings throughout the community, so I can be available to any of my constituents without you having to come to my office. Being accessible and communicating with my constituents has always been and will always be my number one priority.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Michael Victorino

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Michael Victorino    Previous Issue Summary Table

I always have an open door policy, I am just a phone call, text or email away from the good people of Maui County. This is part of the reason I chose to serve the people, I am in business, I serve on many community organizations, I feel very strongly that the grass roots ideas of our citizens from the kitchen table to the community garden to the community associations are the foundation of this wonderful place we call home. I attend as many meetings as I can and I am thankful that the citizens whether in my district or not, look to me for assistance. I want to be of assistance, I want to help and make a difference for the sake of our preferred future together.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Paul Laub

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Paul Laub    Previous Issue Summary Table

1st is the Golden Rule “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. 2nd I would propose a required county class in “Dealing with the Constituents”. All county personnel would get equal, adequate training so that they knew exactly what was expected of them in their positions in regards to dealing with the people. Respect would be a key item with the realization that the constituent may not be familiar with the particular processes in a particular department and the employee would be trained to explain it to them and guide them through the process. Communication is the other key to this good relationship.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Robert Carroll

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Robert Carroll    Previous Issue Summary Table

Elected officials must be open minded, accessible and respond to all inquiries.



Support of Citizens response by County Council candidate Wayne Nishiki

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Wayne Nishiki    Previous Issue Summary Table

People may not agree on all of my positions, however I believe people appreciate and respect that I thoroughly research issues before making decisions, speak straight, and I’m not afraid to ask hard questions. I also believe that the work of the Council should be done as openly to the public as possible. For me, this includes abiding by our Sunshine law and not making decisions behind closed doors.



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate Dean Schmucker

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Dean Schmucker    Previous Issue Summary Table

No answer.



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate George Fontaine

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:George Fontaine    Previous Issue Summary Table

As the next State representative for South Maui I will fork to maximize transparency in government. I will operate under an open door policy to ensure that all of my constituents have an opportunity to be heard.

I will work to reverse special-interest-driven policies which are directly opposed to the rights and interests of South Maui residents.

As a Maui Police captain, I helped create Maui Youth Opportunity Camp for at-risk teens. Unlike the incumbent, I protect children, not child molesters.
I support expanding drug courts as an alternative to incarceration. But molesters and violent repeat offenders deserve hard time.

I support charter schools.

With the Catholic Task Force on Homelessness, I help get homeless off beaches and into shelters.
As a certified dive master, I understand the importance of protecting our waters and the aina.

I will promote policies which free the people and encourage them to do the right thing for the environment. I will not use the environment as an excuse to increase taxes and further restrict the people’s freedom.



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate Gil Keith-Agaran

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Gil Keith-Agaran    Previous Issue Summary Table

We need to all recognize that community-focused decision making and respect for local traditions and history is a key to ensuring that the widest segment of people in our island have an input to our shared fortunes. Hawai‘i’s ethnic diversity and multi-culturalism is a hallmark of local life—it begins with Hawaiian culture but also includes aspects of community incorporated from the orient and the mainland. Continued support for culture and the arts ensures that Hawaii’s traditions (both of the host people and the different plantation era groups that developed our local culture) live and thrive through festivals, education and music. But the usual town meeting or public hearing process for decision making has to be balanced with a nuanced understanding of the island ways of discussing (or mulling over) community issues. As is true in any community with a shared history, there will be tensions between old and new residents even if there is consensus about an issue. I’ve had to bridge that tension in my career as a lawyer, an official in State and County government, and now as a legislator.

I know that there’s no perfect process to relationships. Like a marriage, it’s a constant work in progress, with new discoveries, disappointments, and varying stages of anger and love. The Focus Maui Nui (FMN) project, for example, tried hard through a variety of stakeholder meetings, public opinion surveys, and specialized research and interviewing to involve a wide segment of Maui County’s population. FMN wanted to reach segments that do not attend public meetings, or speak out at such public gatherings. FMN also explored gathering information from the usual suspects (business, labor, government, nonprofits, environmentalists, developers, seniors, professionals, media), as well as actively seeking the less powerful or engaged (the poor, certain ethnic groups, immigrants) in their neighborhoods, churches and religious groups, schools, ethnic and cultural organizations, recreational clubs, and senior citizen clubs.

A drawback of being in the State legislature is that the Capitol is on Oahu and the legislative session (January through late- April/early-May) largely takes place in Honolulu. While I tried to come home every weekend during the session, getting direct feedback from Maui residents was rare (the occasional emails, letters, phone calls or visits). I tried to provide information to residents who made contact with me through the two sessions I spent in the legislature. Senator Shan Tsutsui and I also tried to organize public meetings on Maui on topics we thought would be of interest (i.e., the cuts proposed by the Lingle administration to the Department of Agriculture inspectors and programs).



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate Johanna Amorin

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Johanna Amorin    Previous Issue Summary Table

Community is all about working together and living in a safe place with your families, at peace with yourself and respecting your neighbors. Our public servants are in our communities to protect our rights and the rights of others. As a legislator, I will continue to support our public servants in our communities and our people by focusing on our infrastructure needs due to growth and development.



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate Kyle Yamashita

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Kyle Yamashita    Previous Issue Summary Table

I think we can all do a better job in understanding the other’s perspective as we work together to solve problems. It all starts with better communication, and having more citizens come to community meetings to talk with elected officials would be a great start. I feel that I am accessible and make it a point to encourage people to contact me by phone or email. Even better, to visit my office at the state capitol if they are in Honolulu.



Support of Citizens response by State Legislature candidate Netra Halperin

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Netra Halperin    Previous Issue Summary Table

I have been studying non-violent communication (Marshall Rosenberg). I attempt to bring it into all my communication: listening to other’s needs instead of getting stuck on their mode of expression, and being mindful to express myself clearly and respectfully to others.

During my campaign I have been walking door-to-door, talking story with constituents throughout my district. In office I will continue this open door policy.



Support of Citizens response by School Board candidate Barry Wurst

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Next Candidate Previous Candidate
Candidate:Barry Wurst    Previous Issue Summary Table

While we do have many great things happening in our school system, we also have problems that need to be addressed. I believe our main problem is the lack of clear focus and accountability. This is caused by poor communication between the Superintendent and the schools, a carousel of changing priorities and programs, and an unclear vision of what children need to succeed in life.
To address these concerns, I will promote improvement in vertical and lateral communication, move from a punitive to reward model, clarify focus/goals, and demand fiscal responsibility.

Children and adults are often unaware of the interconnectedness of our lifestyles, environment and future opportunities. We need to promote the idea that everything in the community eventually affects our future generations. We need to increase lateral communication and participation. If a school does well, it will positively affect the community and eventually the economy. (Today elementary school, tomorrow the work force!) To further this relationship, we need to build greater relations between industry and schools. It must be a two way street, with schools offering something to local business and community groups and the community supporting the schools.



Support of Citizens response by School Board candidate Ray Hart

Issue: Support of Citizens    Question Previous Candidate
Candidate:Ray Hart    Next Issue Previous Issue Summary Table

All my answers are based on how BOE can contribute to the solutions.

The school is and should always be the center of the community. An effective and involved community produces great schools. Community involvement in schools and education makes education more relevant. The school community council at each school and the local school board at the charter school are designed to encourage this involvement.

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Entry filed under: Food, Gardening & Agriculture, Political Action, Renewable Energy, Transportation, Water.

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3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Marilyn  |  September 13, 2010 at 10:56 pm

    Quite a long read but a very informative collection of each of the candidates responses to water issues, waste management and Maui County economic needs… Each candidate seems to be knowlegable of water issues. Are they aware of the real costs of drilling wells vs. Buying water from private owners who wish to sell their well to the County for a very high price?
    Also what is being done with the so called bio-solid waste which includes sewage (sludge) being transported to the landfill and mixed with green waste. Is this still being done? Toxic chemicals disposed of in the sewage, cancer causing irritants shouldn’t be in gardens or parks or sold in our local hardware stores as “Organic”… Can someone please advise me.. I referenced articles in Maui News 2007, re Maui Eko-Compost… Is this use of bio-solids still being done. Harry Eager of the Maui News e-mailed me stating “Don’t believe everything you read.”

    Reply
  • 2. kathybecklin  |  September 15, 2010 at 8:41 am

    Aloha Marilyn,
    Contact the County Waste Department for the latest and greatest information and share with us. This is what I understand from the last time I went on “Tour Du Trash” (which should be starting up again soon and is really a great tour for anyone interested in Maui County Waste and Recyling). Maui Eko-Compost takes sewer sludge from “Pump Stations” from boats, porta-potties, cesspools,etc. and mixes them with green waste under carefully supervised and following high standards to create the compost. I personally choose not to use it but know many who swear by the stuff. The majority of our sewage is processed in our Waste Treatment Centers. The “sludge” from that (which is pretty toxic) is put into our landfill. Normal human waste is not the problem; it is the chemicals we put into our bodies that don’t break down or worse yet — the drugs people flush down the toilet (don’t do that!) Anyone else who knows something is encouraged to comment.

    Reply
  • 3. Theola Terbush  |  April 15, 2011 at 7:39 pm

    Someone necessarily assist to make severely posts I might state. This is the first time I frequented your web page and so far? I surprised with the research you made to make this actual post incredible. Wonderful activity!

    Reply

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